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Skeletal muscle satellite cells, mitochondria, and microRNAs: their involvement in the pathogenesis of ALS

Tsitkanou, Stavroula, Della Gatta, Paul A and Russell, Aaron P 2016, Skeletal muscle satellite cells, mitochondria, and microRNAs: their involvement in the pathogenesis of ALS, Frontiers in psychology, vol. 7, Article number: 403, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.3389/fphys.2016.00403.

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Title Skeletal muscle satellite cells, mitochondria, and microRNAs: their involvement in the pathogenesis of ALS
Author(s) Tsitkanou, Stavroula
Della Gatta, Paul AORCID iD for Della Gatta, Paul A orcid.org/0000-0003-2231-8370
Russell, Aaron PORCID iD for Russell, Aaron P orcid.org/0000-0002-7323-9501
Journal name Frontiers in psychology
Volume number 7
Season Article number: 403
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2016-09-13
ISSN 1664-1078
Keyword(s) skeletal muscle
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
satellite cell
mitochondria
miRNA
neuromuscular junction
Summary Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND), is a fatal motor neuron disorder. It results in progressive degeneration and death of upper and lower motor neurons, protein aggregation, severe muscle atrophy and respiratory insufficiency. Median survival with ALS is between 2 and 5 years from the onset of symptoms. ALS manifests as either familial ALS (FALS) (~10% of cases) or sporadic ALS (SALS), (~90% of cases). Mutations in the copper/zinc (CuZn) superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene account for ~20% of FALS cases and the mutant SOD1 mouse model has been used extensively to help understand the ALS pathology. As the precise mechanisms causing ALS are not well understood there is presently no cure. Recent evidence suggests that motor neuron degradation may involve a cell non-autonomous phenomenon involving numerous cell types within various tissues. Skeletal muscle is now considered as an important tissue involved in the pathogenesis of ALS by activating a retrograde signaling cascade that degrades motor neurons. Skeletal muscle heath and function are regulated by numerous factors including satellite cells, mitochondria and microRNAs. Studies demonstrate that in ALS these factors show various levels of dysregulation within the skeletal muscle. This review provides an overview of their dysregulation in various ALS models as well as how they may contribute individually and/or synergistically to the ALS pathogenesis.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2016.00403
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089236

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.