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Color change for Thermoregulation versus camouflage in free-ranging lizards

Smith, Kathleen R., Cadena, Viviana, Endler, John A., Kearney, Michael R., Porter, Warren P. and Stuart-Fox, Devi 2016, Color change for Thermoregulation versus camouflage in free-ranging lizards, American naturalist, vol. 188, no. 6, pp. 668-678, doi: 10.1086/688765.

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Title Color change for Thermoregulation versus camouflage in free-ranging lizards
Author(s) Smith, Kathleen R.
Cadena, Viviana
Endler, John A.ORCID iD for Endler, John A. orcid.org/0000-0002-7557-7627
Kearney, Michael R.
Porter, Warren P.
Stuart-Fox, Devi
Journal name American naturalist
Volume number 188
Issue number 6
Start page 668
End page 678
Total pages 11
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Place of publication Chicago, Ill.
Publication date 2016-12
ISSN 0003-0147
1537-5323
Keyword(s) color change
near-infrared
camouflage
thermoregulation
Summary Animal coloration has multiple functions including thermoregulation,camouflage, and social signaling, and the requirementsof each function may sometimes conflict. Many terrestrial ectothermsaccommodate the multiple functions of color through color change.However, the relative importance of these functions and how colorchangingspecies accommodate themwhen they do conflict are poorlyunderstood because we lack data on color change in the wild. Here, weshow that the color of individual radio-tracked bearded dragon lizards,Pogona vitticeps, correlates strongly with background color andless strongly, but significantly, with temperature. We found no evidencethat individuals simultaneously optimize camouflage and thermoregulationby choosing light backgrounds when hot or dark backgroundswhen cold. In laboratory experiments, lizards showed both UV-visible(300–700 nm) and near-infrared (700–2,100 nm) reflectance changesin response to different background and temperature treatments, consistentwith camouflage and thermoregulatory functions, respectively,but with no interaction between the two. Overall, our results suggestthat wild bearded dragons change color to improve both thermoregulationand camouflage but predominantly adjust for camouflage, suggestingthat compromising camouflage may entail a greater potentialimmediate survival cost.
Language eng
DOI 10.1086/688765
Field of Research 060899 Zoology not elsewhere classified
060399 Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, University of Chicago
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089251

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.