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Western cultural identification explains variations in the objectification model for eating pathology across Australian Caucasians and Asian women

Tan, Charmain S., Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew, Utpala, Ranjani, Yeung, Victoria Wai Lan, De Paoli, Tara, Loughan, Stephen and Krug, Isabel 2016, Western cultural identification explains variations in the objectification model for eating pathology across Australian Caucasians and Asian women, Frontiers in psychology, vol. 7, Article number: 1578, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01578.

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Title Western cultural identification explains variations in the objectification model for eating pathology across Australian Caucasians and Asian women
Author(s) Tan, Charmain S.
Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, MatthewORCID iD for Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-1145-6057
Utpala, Ranjani
Yeung, Victoria Wai Lan
De Paoli, Tara
Loughan, Stephen
Krug, Isabel
Journal name Frontiers in psychology
Volume number 7
Season Article number: 1578
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2016-10-14
ISSN 1664-1078
Keyword(s) objectification
body shame
appearance anxiety thin-ideal internalization
eating pathology
cultural
western cultural identification
Summary Objective: To assess differences in trait objectifying measures and eating pathology between Australian Caucasians and Asian women living in Australia and in Hong Kong with high and low levels of western cultural identification (WCI) and to see if exposure to objectifying images had an effect on state-objectification. A further aim was to assess using path analyses whether an extended version of the objectification model, including thin-ideal internalization, differed depending on the level of WCI.

Method: A total of 424 participants comprising 162 Australian Caucasians and 262 Asians (n = 183 currently residing in Australia and n = 79 living in Hong Kong) took part in the study. Of the overall Asian sample, 133 individuals were classified as high-WCI and 129 participants as low-WCI. Participants were randomly allocated into one of two conditions, presenting either objectifying images of attractive and thin Asian and Caucasian female models (objectification group, n = 204), or showing neutral images of objects (e.g., chairs, tables; control group, n = 220). Subsequently, participants were asked to complete a series of questionnaires assessing objectification processes and eating pathology.

Results: Findings revealed that the Caucasian group presented with significantly higher internalization and body surveillance scores than either of the two Asian groups and also revealed higher scores on trait-self-objectification than the low-WCI Asian sample. As regards to the effects of objectifying images on state self-objectification, we found that ratings were higher after exposure to women than to control objects for all groups. Finally, multi-group analyses revealed that our revised objectification model functioned equally across the Caucasian and the high-WCI Asian group, but differed between the Caucasian and the low-WCI Asian group.

Conclusion:
Our findings outline that individuals with varying levels of WCI might respond differently to self-objectification processes. Levels of WCI should therefore be taken into consideration when working with women from different cultural backgrounds.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01578
Field of Research 170110 Psychological Methodology, Design and Analysis
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089267

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.