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The association between higher maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index and increased birth weight, adiposity and inflammation in the newborn

McCloskey, K., Ponsonby, A.-L., Collier, F., Allen, K., Tang, M.L.K., Carlin, J.B., Saffery, R., Skilton, M.R., Cheung, M., Ranganathan, S., Dwyer, T., Burgner, D. and Vuillermin, P. 2016, The association between higher maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index and increased birth weight, adiposity and inflammation in the newborn, Pediatric obesity, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12187.

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Title The association between higher maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index and increased birth weight, adiposity and inflammation in the newborn
Author(s) McCloskey, K.
Ponsonby, A.-L.
Collier, F.
Allen, K.
Tang, M.L.K.
Carlin, J.B.
Saffery, R.
Skilton, M.R.
Cheung, M.
Ranganathan, S.
Dwyer, T.
Burgner, D.
Vuillermin, P.
Journal name Pediatric obesity
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-10-09
ISSN 2047-6310
Keyword(s) neonatal
obesity
offspring
pregnancy
Summary BACKGROUND: Excess adiposity and adiposity-related inflammation are known risk factors for cardiovascular disease in adults; however, little is known regarding the determinants of adiposity-related inflammation at birth. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and newborn adiposity and inflammation. METHODS: Paired maternal (28-week gestation) and infant (umbilical cord) blood samples were collected from a population-derived birth cohort (Barwon Infant Study, n = 1074). Data on maternal comorbidities and infant birth anthropomorphic measures were compiled, and infant aortic intima-media thickness was measured by trans-abdominal ultrasound. In a selected subgroup of term infants (n = 161), matched maternal and cord lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and maternal soluble CD14 were measured. Analysis was completed by using pairwise correlation and linear regression. Because of their non-normal distribution, pathology blood measures were log transformed prior to analysis. RESULTS: Maternal pre-pregnancy BMI was positively associated with increased birth weight (mean difference 17.8 g per kg m(-2) , 95% CI 6.6 to 28.9; p = 0.002), newborn mean skin-fold thickness (mean difference 0.1 mm per kg m(-2) , 95% CI 0.0 to 0.1; p < 0.001) and cord blood hsCRP (mean difference of 4.2% increase in hsCRP per kg m(-2) increase in pre-pregnancy BMI, 95% CI 0.6 to 7.7%, p = 0.02), but not cord blood soluble CD14. Inclusion of maternal hsCRP as a covariate attenuated the associations between pre-pregnancy BMI and both newborn skin-fold thickness and cord blood hsCRP. CONCLUSION: Higher maternal pre-pregnancy BMI is associated with increased newborn adiposity and inflammation. These associations may be partially mediated by maternal inflammation during pregnancy.
Notes In Press
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/ijpo.12187
Field of Research 111499 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, World Obesity Federation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089278

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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