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The effects of maternal anxiety during pregnancy on IGF2/H19 methylation in cord blood

Mansell, T., Novakovic, B., Meyer, B., Rzehak, P., Vuillermin, P., Ponsonby, A-L., Collier, F., Burgner, D., Saffery, R., Ryan, J. and BIS investigator team 2016, The effects of maternal anxiety during pregnancy on IGF2/H19 methylation in cord blood, Translational psychiatry, vol. 6, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1038/tp.2016.32.

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Title The effects of maternal anxiety during pregnancy on IGF2/H19 methylation in cord blood
Formatted title The effects of maternal anxiety during pregnancy on IGF2/H19 methylation in cord blood
Author(s) Mansell, T.
Novakovic, B.
Meyer, B.
Rzehak, P.
Vuillermin, P.
Ponsonby, A-L.
Collier, F.
Burgner, D.
Saffery, R.
Ryan, J.
BIS investigator team
Journal name Translational psychiatry
Volume number 6
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-03-29
ISSN 2158-3188
Keyword(s) Adult
Anxiety
Cohort Studies
DNA Methylation
Depression
Female
Fetal Blood
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Insulin-Like Growth Factor II
Linear Models
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Prospective Studies
RNA, Long Noncoding
Stress, Psychological
BIS investigator team
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
POSTNATAL DEPRESSION SCALE
LOW-BIRTH-WEIGHT
RECEPTOR GENE NR3C1
FOLIC-ACID USE
PRENATAL EXPOSURE
PERCEIVED STRESS
FETAL-GROWTH
LIFE EVENTS
METAANALYSIS
Summary Compelling evidence suggests that maternal mental health in pregnancy can influence fetal development. The imprinted genes, insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and H19, are involved in fetal growth and each is regulated by DNA methylation. This study aimed to determine the association between maternal mental well-being during pregnancy and differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of IGF2 (DMR0) and the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region (ICR) in newborn offspring. Maternal depression, anxiety and perceived stress were assessed at 28 weeks of pregnancy in the Barwon Infant Study (n=576). DNA methylation was measured in purified cord blood mononuclear cells using the Sequenom MassArray Platform. Maternal anxiety was associated with a decrease in average ICR methylation (Δ=-2.23%; 95% CI=-3.68 to -0.77%), and across all six of the individual CpG units in anxious compared with non-anxious groups. Birth weight and sex modified the association between prenatal anxiety and infant methylation. When stratified into lower (⩽3530 g) and higher (>3530 g) birth weight groups using the median birth weight, there was a stronger association between anxiety and ICR methylation in the lower birth weight group (Δ=-3.89%; 95% CI=-6.06 to -1.72%), with no association in the higher birth weight group. When stratified by infant sex, there was a stronger association in female infants (Δ=-3.70%; 95% CI=-5.90 to -1.51%) and no association in males. All the linear regression models were adjusted for maternal age, smoking and folate intake. These findings show that maternal anxiety in pregnancy is associated with decreased IGF2/H19 ICR DNA methylation in progeny at birth, particularly in female, low birth weight neonates. ICR methylation may help link poor maternal mental health and adverse birth outcomes, but further investigation is needed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/tp.2016.32
Field of Research 111499 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089286

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.