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The effects of flexitime on individual work performance

Mrkic, Dejan and von Treuer, Kathryn 2016, The effects of flexitime on individual work performance, Management education, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 13-23.


Title The effects of flexitime on individual work performance
Author(s) Mrkic, Dejan
von Treuer, Kathryn
Journal name Management education
Volume number 16
Issue number 1
Start page 13
End page 23
Total pages 11
Publisher Common Ground Publishing
Place of publication Champaign, Ill.
Publication date 2016-04-04
ISSN 2327-8005
2327-9273
Summary While flexitime is becoming a cornerstone of twenty-first century employment, flexitime policies have been largely geared toward satisfying work-life balance needs. A wider argument is emerging, which proposes that a performance case exists for flexitime. However, the empirical findings remain inconclusive. Although several limitations of prior studies have been explored, no known studies have addressed the inadequate measure of work performance, which might account for this variability. The aim of this study was to compare individual performance outcomes as a function of two-work schedules (i.e. flexitime and a traditional schedule) using the Multilevel Performance Inventory (MPI). This instrument captures an expanded set of performance behaviors. Specifically, the purpose was to determine whether flexitime employees would score higher on key performance indicators relative to the traditional hours (or control) group. The sample consisted of 136 participants either working a flexitime schedule (n = 58) or a traditional schedule (n = 78). Participants were distributed across a number of industries. A one-way MANOVA revealed a nonsignificant multivariate effect, F (9, 126) = 1.06, p > .05, η2 = .07. We identified likely reasons for the non-significant findings by integrating the findings with previous empirical research and examined the implications for future research.
Language eng
Field of Research 170299 Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Common Ground Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089296

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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