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Novel application of a discrete choice experiment to identify preferences for a national healthcare-associated infection surveillance programme: a cross-sectional study

Russo, Philip L., Chen, Gang, Cheng, Allen C., Richards, Michael, Graves, Nicholas, Ratcliffe, Julie and Hall, Lisa 2016, Novel application of a discrete choice experiment to identify preferences for a national healthcare-associated infection surveillance programme: a cross-sectional study, BMJ open, vol. 6, no. 5, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011397.

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Title Novel application of a discrete choice experiment to identify preferences for a national healthcare-associated infection surveillance programme: a cross-sectional study
Author(s) Russo, Philip L.ORCID iD for Russo, Philip L. orcid.org/0000-0003-3822-0554
Chen, Gang
Cheng, Allen C.
Richards, Michael
Graves, Nicholas
Ratcliffe, Julie
Hall, Lisa
Journal name BMJ open
Volume number 6
Issue number 5
Article ID e011397
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BMJ Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-05
ISSN 2044-6055
2044-6055
Summary Objective: To identify key stakeholder preferences andpriorities when considering a national healthcareassociatedinfection (HAI) surveillance programmethrough the use of a discrete choice experiment (DCE).Setting: Australia does not have a national HAIsurveillance programme. An online web-based DCE wasdeveloped and made available to participants in Australia.Participants: A sample of 184 purposively selectedhealthcare workers based on their senior leadershiprole in infection prevention in Australia.Primary and secondary outcomes: A DCErequiring respondents to select 1 HAI surveillanceprogramme over another based on 5 differentcharacteristics (or attributes) in repeated hypotheticalscenarios. Data were analysed using a mixed logitmodel to evaluate preferences and identify the relativeimportance of each attribute.Results: A total of 122 participants completed thesurvey (response rate 66%) over a 5-week period.Excluding 22 who mismatched a duplicate choicescenario, analysis was conducted on 100 responses.The key findings included: 72% of stakeholdersexhibited a preference for a surveillance programmewith continuous mandatory core components (meancoefficient 0.640 ( p<0.01)), 65% for a standardsurveillance protocol where patient-level data arecollected on infected and non-infected patients (meancoefficient 0.641 ( p<0.01)), and 92% for hospital-leveldata that are publicly reported on a website and notassociated with financial penalties (mean coefficient1.663 ( p<0.01)).Conclusions: The use of the DCE has provided aunique insight to key stakeholder priorities whenconsidering a national HAI surveillance programme.The application of a DCE offers a meaningful methodto explore and quantify preferences in this setting.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011397
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089395

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.