You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Differences in identifying healthcare associated infections using clinical vignettes and the influence of respondent characteristics: a cross-sectional survey of Australian infection prevention staff

Russo, Philip L., Barnett, Adrian G., Cheng, Allen C., Richards, Michael, Graves, Nicholas and Hall, Lisa 2015, Differences in identifying healthcare associated infections using clinical vignettes and the influence of respondent characteristics: a cross-sectional survey of Australian infection prevention staff, Antimicrobial resistance and infection control, vol. 4, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1186/s13756-015-0070-7.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
russo-differencesinidentifying-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 518.88KB 9

Title Differences in identifying healthcare associated infections using clinical vignettes and the influence of respondent characteristics: a cross-sectional survey of Australian infection prevention staff
Author(s) Russo, Philip L.ORCID iD for Russo, Philip L. orcid.org/0000-0003-3822-0554
Barnett, Adrian G.
Cheng, Allen C.
Richards, Michael
Graves, Nicholas
Hall, Lisa
Journal name Antimicrobial resistance and infection control
Volume number 4
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-07-19
ISSN 2047-2994
Keyword(s) Clinical vignettes
Data accuracy
Healthcare associated infections
Surveillance
Summary BACKGROUND: Australia has commenced public reporting and benchmarking of healthcare associated infections (HAIs), despite not having a standardised national HAI surveillance program. Annual hospital Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream (SAB) infection rates are released online, with other HAIs likely to be reported in the future. Although there are known differences between hospitals in Australian HAI surveillance programs, the effect of these differences on reported HAI rates is not known.

OBJECTIVE: To measure the agreement in HAI identification, classification, and calculation of HAI rates, and investigate the influence of differences amongst those undertaking surveillance on these outcomes.

METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey exploring HAI surveillance practices was administered to infection prevention nurses who undertake HAI surveillance. Seven clinical vignettes describing HAI scenarios were included to measure agreement in HAI identification, classification, and calculation of HAI rates. Data on characteristics of respondents was also collected. Three of the vignettes were related to surgical site infection and four to bloodstream infection. Agreement levels for each of the vignettes were calculated. Using the Australian SAB definition, and the National Health and Safety Network definitions for other HAIs, we looked for an association between the proportion of correct answers and the respondents' characteristics.

RESULTS: Ninety-two infection prevention nurses responded to the vignettes. One vignette demonstrated 100 % agreement from responders, whilst agreement for the other vignettes varied from 53 to 75 %. Working in a hospital with more than 400 beds, working in a team, and State or Territory was associated with a correct response for two of the vignettes. Those trained in surveillance were more commonly associated with a correct response, whilst those working part-time were less likely to respond correctly.

CONCLUSION: These findings reveal the need for further HAI surveillance support for those working part-time and in smaller facilities. It also confirms the need to improve uniformity of HAI surveillance across Australian hospitals, and raises questions on the validity of the current comparing of national HAI SAB rates.
Notes Article number: 29
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s13756-015-0070-7
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Russo et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089396

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 23 Abstract Views, 10 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 25 Nov 2016, 14:53:29 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.