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The Chinese-born immigrant infant feeding and growth hypothesis

Bolton, Kristy A., Kremer, Peter, Hesketh, Kylie D., Laws, Rachel and Campbell, Karen J. 2016, The Chinese-born immigrant infant feeding and growth hypothesis, BMC public health, vol. 16, Article Number : 1071, pp. 1-5, doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-3677-6.

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Title The Chinese-born immigrant infant feeding and growth hypothesis
Author(s) Bolton, Kristy A.ORCID iD for Bolton, Kristy A. orcid.org/0000-0001-6721-4503
Kremer, PeterORCID iD for Kremer, Peter orcid.org/0000-0003-2476-1958
Hesketh, Kylie D.ORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie D. orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Laws, RachelORCID iD for Laws, Rachel orcid.org/0000-0003-4328-1116
Campbell, Karen J.ORCID iD for Campbell, Karen J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 16
Season Article Number : 1071
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-10-11
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Australia
Chinese
Culture
Feeding practices
Immigrants
Infant
Maternal child health
Obesity
Overweight
Rapid growth
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
RAPID WEIGHT-GAIN
CHILDHOOD OBESITY
SCHOOL-CHILDREN
LOWER PROTEIN
RISK
LIFE
ETHNICITY
TRIAL
POPULATION
Summary BACKGROUND: Rapid growth in the first six months of life is a well-established risk factor for childhood obesity, and child feeding practices (supplementation or substitution of breast milk with formula and early introduction of solids) have been reported to predict this. The third largest immigrant group in Australia originate from China. Case-studies reported from Victorian Maternal and Child Health nurses suggest that rapid growth trajectories in the infants of Chinese parents is common place. Furthermore, these nurses report that high value is placed by this client group on rapid growth and a fatter child; that rates of breastfeeding are low and overfeeding of infant formula is high. There are currently no studies which describe infant growth or its correlates among this immigrant group.

PRESENTATION OF HYPOTHESIS: We postulate that in Australia, Chinese-born immigrant mothers will have different infant feeding practices compared to non-immigrant mothers and this will result in different growth trajectories and risk of overweight. We present the Chinese-born immigrant infant feeding and growth hypothesis - that less breastfeeding, high formula feeding and early introduction of solids in infants of Chinese-born immigrant mothers living in Australia will result in a high protein intake and subsequent rapid growth trajectory and increased risk of overweight and obesity.

TESTING THE HYPOTHESIS: Three related studies will be conducted to investigate the hypothesis. These will include two quantitative studies (one cross-sectional, one longitudinal) and a qualitative study. The quantitative studies will investigate differences in feeding practices in Chinese-born immigrant compared to non-immigrant mothers and infants; and the growth trajectories over the first 3.5 years of life. The qualitative study will provide more in-depth understanding of the influencing factors on feeding practices in Chinese-born immigrant mothers.

IMPLICATIONS OF THE HYPOTHESIS: This study will provide evidence of the potential modifiable feeding practices and risk of overweight faced by Chinese-born immigrants living in Australia. This is important to help identify groups at risk of rapid growth and subsequent risk of obesity, to identify opportunities for intervention, and to be able to tailor prevention initiatives appropriately.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3677-6
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089451

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.