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Psychosocial characteristics and obstetric health of women attending a specialist substance use antenatal clinic in a large metropolitan hospital

Burns, Lucy, Conroy, Elizabeth, Moore, Elizabeth A., Hutchinson, Delyse and Haber, Paul S. 2011, Psychosocial characteristics and obstetric health of women attending a specialist substance use antenatal clinic in a large metropolitan hospital, International journal of pediatrics, vol. 2011, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1155/2011/729237.

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Title Psychosocial characteristics and obstetric health of women attending a specialist substance use antenatal clinic in a large metropolitan hospital
Author(s) Burns, Lucy
Conroy, Elizabeth
Moore, Elizabeth A.
Hutchinson, DelyseORCID iD for Hutchinson, Delyse orcid.org/0000-0003-3221-7143
Haber, Paul S.
Journal name International journal of pediatrics
Volume number 2011
Article ID 729237
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher Hindawi
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1687-9740
1687-9759
Summary Objective. This paper reports the findings comparing the obstetrical health, antenatal care, and psychosocial characteristics of pregnant women with a known history of substance dependence (n = 41) and a comparison group of pregnant women attending a general antenatal clinic (n  = 47).

Method. Face-to-face interviews were used to assess obstetrical health, antenatal care, physical and mental functioning, substance use, and exposure to violence.

Results. The substance-dependent group had more difficulty accessing antenatal care and reported more obstetrical health complications during pregnancy. Women in the substance-dependent group were more likely to report not wanting to become pregnant and were less likely to report using birth control at the time of conception.

Conclusions. The profile of pregnant women (in specialised antenatal care for substance dependence) is one of severe disadvantage and poor health. The challenge is to develop and resource innovative and effective multisectoral systems to educate women and provide effective care for both women and infants.
Language eng
DOI 10.1155/2011/729237
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920507 Women's Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089475

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.