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Sprint interval and traditional endurance training increase net intramuscular triglyceride breakdown and expression of perilipin 2 and 5

Shepherd, S. O., Cocks, M., Tipton, K. D., Ranasinghe, A. M., Barker, T. A., Burniston, J. G., Wagenmakers, A. J. M. and Shaw, C. S 2013, Sprint interval and traditional endurance training increase net intramuscular triglyceride breakdown and expression of perilipin 2 and 5, Journal of physiology, vol. 591, no. 3, pp. 657-675, doi: 10.1113/jphysiol.2012.240952.

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Title Sprint interval and traditional endurance training increase net intramuscular triglyceride breakdown and expression of perilipin 2 and 5
Author(s) Shepherd, S. O.
Cocks, M.
Tipton, K. D.
Ranasinghe, A. M.
Barker, T. A.
Burniston, J. G.
Wagenmakers, A. J. M.
Shaw, C. SORCID iD for Shaw, C. S orcid.org/0000-0003-1499-0220
Journal name Journal of physiology
Volume number 591
Issue number 3
Start page 657
End page 675
Total pages 19
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013-02
ISSN 0022-3751
1469-7793
Keyword(s) Adult
Bicycling
Blood Glucose
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Male
Membrane Proteins
Muscle, Skeletal
Perilipin-2
Perilipin-5
Physical Endurance
Proteins
Sedentary Lifestyle
Triglycerides
Young Adult
Summary Intramuscular triglyceride (IMTG) utilization is enhanced by endurance training (ET) and is linked to improved insulin sensitivity. This study first investigated the hypothesis that ET-induced increases in net IMTG breakdown and insulin sensitivity are related to increased expression of perilipin 2 (PLIN2) and perilipin 5 (PLIN5). Second, we hypothesized that sprint interval training (SIT) also promotes increases in IMTG utilization and insulin sensitivity. Sixteen sedentary males performed 6 weeks of either SIT (4-6, 30 s Wingate tests per session, 3 days week(-1)) or ET (40-60 min moderate-intensity cycling, 5 days week(-1)). Training increased resting IMTG content (SIT 1.7-fold, ET 2.4-fold; P < 0.05), concomitant with parallel increases in PLIN2 (SIT 2.3-fold, ET 2.8-fold; P < 0.01) and PLIN5 expression (SIT 2.2-fold, ET 3.1-fold; P < 0.01). Pre-training, 60 min cycling at ∼65% pre-training decreased IMTG content in type I fibres (SIT 17 ± 10%, ET 15 ± 12%; P < 0.05). Following training, a significantly greater breakdown of IMTG in type I fibres occurred during exercise (SIT 27 ± 13%, ET 43 ± 6%; P < 0.05), with preferential breakdown of PLIN2- and particularly PLIN5-associated lipid droplets. Training increased the Matsuda insulin sensitivity index (SIT 56 ± 15%, ET 29 ± 12%; main effect P < 0.05). No training × group interactions were observed for any variables. In conclusion, SIT and ET both increase net IMTG breakdown during exercise and increase in PLIN2 and PLIN5 protein expression. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that increases in PLIN2 and PLIN5 are related to the mechanisms that promote increased IMTG utilization during exercise and improve insulin sensitivity following 6 weeks of SIT and ET.
Language eng
DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.2012.240952
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, The Authors and The Physiological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089574

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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