Patient-controlled intranasal fentanyl analgesia: a pilot study to assess practicality and tolerability during childbirth

Kerr, D, Taylor, D and Evans, B 2015, Patient-controlled intranasal fentanyl analgesia: a pilot study to assess practicality and tolerability during childbirth, International journal of obstetric anesthesia, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 117-123, doi: 10.1016/j.ijoa.2014.11.006.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Patient-controlled intranasal fentanyl analgesia: a pilot study to assess practicality and tolerability during childbirth
Author(s) Kerr, DORCID iD for Kerr, D orcid.org/0000-0002-2956-2432
Taylor, D
Evans, B
Journal name International journal of obstetric anesthesia
Volume number 24
Issue number 2
Start page 117
End page 123
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-05
ISSN 0959-289X
Keyword(s) Analgesia
Childbirth
Fentanyl
Intranasal
Obstetric
Patient-controlled
Summary Background: Intranasal administration of fentanyl is a non-invasive method of analgesic delivery which has been shown to be effective. This pilot study aimed to assess the practicality and tolerability of patient-controlled intranasal fentanyl for relieving pain during childbirth. Methods: This prospective, non-randomised, clinical trial recruited women with a singleton pregnancy during November 2009 to October 2011. Exclusion criteria included respiratory disease, gestation <37 weeks and pregnancy complications. The device administered fentanyl 54 lg per spray, incorporating a 3-min lock-out. Data collected included demographics, dose, additional analgesia, adverse events, pain relief and delivery outcomes. Follow-up data were obtained within 48 h regarding tolerability of the device. Results: The final sample included 32 women: mean age was 28.7 years and gestation 39.8 weeks. Mean fentanyl dose was 734 lg and duration of use was 3.5 h. Most women (78.2%) reported satisfactory to excellent pain relief using the nasal device. Four neonates (12.5%) required bag-mask ventilation at birth: three had adequate respiration within 5 min and one required short-term observation in the special-care nursery. For all items, there was a trend towards an adverse outcome, including neonatal respiratory support, as the dose of fentanyl increased. On follow-up, 84.4% reported they would use intranasal fentanyl for their next childbirth experience. Conclusions: Patient-controlled intranasal fentanyl provides an acceptable level of analgesia during childbirth. It may, however, increase the risk of neonatal respiratory depression. Future, randomised studies should evaluate the safety and efficacy of patient-controlled intranasal fentanyl compared with existing analgesia options.
Notes publisher: Elsevier articletitle: Patient-controlled intranasal fentanyl analgesia: a pilot study to assess practicality and tolerability during childbirth journaltitle: International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia articlelink: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijoa.2014.11.006 content_type: article copyright: Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.ijoa.2014.11.006
Field of Research 111499 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089607

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 257 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 29 Nov 2016, 12:49:39 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.