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The impact of health literacy and life style risk factors on health-related quality of life of Australian patients

Jayasinghe, Upali W., Harris, Mark Fort, Parker, Sharon M., Litt, John, van Driel, Mieke, Mazza, Danielle, Del Mar, Chris, Lloyd, Jane, Smith, Jane, Zwar, Nicholas, Taylor, Richard, Preventive Evidence into Practice (PEP) Partnership Group and Laws, Rachel 2016, The impact of health literacy and life style risk factors on health-related quality of life of Australian patients, Health and quality of life outcomes, vol. 14, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1186/s12955-016-0471-1.

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Title The impact of health literacy and life style risk factors on health-related quality of life of Australian patients
Author(s) Jayasinghe, Upali W.
Harris, Mark Fort
Parker, Sharon M.
Litt, John
van Driel, Mieke
Mazza, Danielle
Del Mar, Chris
Lloyd, Jane
Smith, Jane
Zwar, Nicholas
Taylor, Richard
Preventive Evidence into Practice (PEP) Partnership Group
Laws, RachelORCID iD for Laws, Rachel orcid.org/0000-0003-4328-1116
Journal name Health and quality of life outcomes
Volume number 14
Article ID 68
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-05-04
ISSN 1477-7525
Keyword(s) Health literacy
Life style risk factors
Mental component score
Multilevel regression analysis
Physical component score
Quality of life
SF-12 version 2
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Australia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Patients
Risk Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Preventive Evidence into Practice (PEP) Partnership Group
Summary BACKGROUND: Limited evidence exists regarding the relationship between health literacy and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Australian patients from primary care. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of health literacy on HRQoL in a large sample of patients without known vascular disease or diabetes and to examine whether the difference in HRQoL between low and high health literacy groups was clinically significant.

METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of baseline data from a cluster randomised trial. The study included 739 patients from 30 general practices across four Australian states conducted in 2012 and 2013 using the standard Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) version 2. SF-12 physical component score (PCS-12) and mental component score (MCS-12) are derived using the standard US algorithm. Health literacy was measured using the Health Literacy Management Scale (HeLMS). Multilevel regression analysis (patients at level 1 and general practices at level 2) was applied to relate PCS-12 and MCS-12 to patient reported life style risk behaviours including health literacy and demographic factors.

RESULTS: Low health literacy patients were more likely to be smokers (12 % vs 6 %, P = 0.005), do insufficient physical activity (63 % vs 47 %, P < 0.001), be overweight (68 % vs 52 %, P < 0.001), and have lower physical health and lower mental health with large clinically significant effect sizes of 0.56 (B (regression coefficient) = -5.4, P < 0.001) and 0.78(B = -6.4, P < 0.001) respectively after adjustment for confounding factors. Patients with insufficient physical activity were likely to have a lower physical health score (effect size = 0.42, B = -3.1, P < 0.001) and lower mental health (effect size = 0.37, B = -2.6, P < 0.001). Being overweight tended to be related to a lower PCS-12 (effect size = 0.41, B = -1.8, P < 0.05). Less well-educated, unemployed and smoking patients with low health literacy reported worse physical health. Health literacy accounted for 45 and 70 % of the total between patient variance explained in PCS-12 and MCS-12 respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: Addressing health literacy related barriers to preventive care may help reduce some of the disparities in HRQoL. Recognising and tailoring health related communication to those with low health literacy may improve health outcomes including HRQoL in general practice.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12955-016-0471-1
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089703

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.