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Attachment styles at work: measurement, collegial relationships, and burnout

Leiter, Michael P., Day, Arla and Price, Lisa 2015, Attachment styles at work: measurement, collegial relationships, and burnout, Burnout research, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 25-35, doi: 10.1016/j.burn.2015.02.003.

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Title Attachment styles at work: measurement, collegial relationships, and burnout
Author(s) Leiter, Michael P.ORCID iD for Leiter, Michael P. orcid.org/0000-0001-5680-0363
Day, Arla
Price, Lisa
Journal name Burnout research
Volume number 2
Issue number 1
Start page 25
End page 35
Total pages 11
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-03
ISSN 2213-0586
Summary Although the potential deleterious effects of negative social interactions at work have been well established in the literature, the impact of personal factors in forming work relationships has been relatively neglected. Therefore, using a survey of 1624 Canadian healthcare providers, we examined the extent to which attachment styles at work were associated with the quality of social relationships. We found support for a new measure of attachment styles at work that differentiated between anxiety and avoidance attachment. Avoidance was negatively correlated with positive social constructs (civility, psychological safety, and trust) and with the efficacy dimension of burnout. Overall, compared to attachment avoidance, attachment anxiety was more strongly correlated with experienced and instigated workplace incivility, exhaustion, and cynicism. Attachment avoidance was negatively correlated with positive social constructs (civility, psychological safety, and trust) and with the efficacy dimension of burnout. Adding these two attachment dimensions to a model of burnout as a function of workload, value congruence, and coworker incivility significantly improved its fit. This study suggests that employees with high attachment anxiety tend to be more closely involved in work relationships and processes, but this closeness comes at a cost in that they experience more strain when participating in social encounters.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.burn.2015.02.003
Field of Research 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089731

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.