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Phylogeography of the antilopine wallaroo (Macropus antilopinus) across tropical northern Australia

Wadley, Jessica J, Fordham, Damien A, Thomson, Vicki A, Ritchie, Euan and Austin, Jeremy J 2016, Phylogeography of the antilopine wallaroo (Macropus antilopinus) across tropical northern Australia, Ecology and evolution, vol. 6, no. 22, pp. 8050-8061, doi: 10.1002/ece3.2381.

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Title Phylogeography of the antilopine wallaroo (Macropus antilopinus) across tropical northern Australia
Author(s) Wadley, Jessica J
Fordham, Damien A
Thomson, Vicki A
Ritchie, Euan
Austin, Jeremy J
Journal name Ecology and evolution
Volume number 6
Issue number 22
Start page 8050
End page 8061
Total pages 12
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2016-11-01
ISSN 2045-7758
Summary The distribution of antilopine wallaroo, Macropus antilopinus, is marked by a break in the species’ range between Queensland and the Northern Territory, coinciding with the Carpentarian barrier. Previous work on M. antilopinus revealed limited genetic differentiation between the Northern Territory and Queensland M. antilopinus populations across this barrier. The study also identified a number of divergent lineages in the Northern Territory, but was unable to elucidate any geographic structure. Here, we re-examine these results to (1) determine phylogeographic patterns across the range of M. antilopinus and (2) infer the biogeographic barriers associated with these patterns. The tropical savannahs of northern Australia: from the Cape York Peninsula in the east, to the Kimberley in the west. We examined phylogeographic patterns in M. antilopinus using a larger number of samples and three mtDNA genes: NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2, cytochrome b, and the control region. Two datasets were generated and analyzed: (1) a subset of samples with all three mtDNA regions concatenated together and (2) all samples for just control region sequences that included samples from the previous study. Analysis included generating phylogenetic trees based on Bayesian analysis and intraspecific median-joining networks. The contemporary spatial structure of M. antilopinus mtDNA lineages revealed five shallow clades and a sixth, divergent lineage. The genetic differences that we found between Queensland and Northern Territory M. antilopinus samples confirmed the split in the geographic distribution of the species. We also found weak genetic differentiation between Northern Territory samples and those from the Kimberley region of Western Australia, possibly due to the Kimberley Plateau–Arnhem Land barrier. Within the Northern Territory, two clades appear to be parapatric in the west, while another two clades are broadly sympatric across the Northern Territory. MtDNA diversity of M. antilopinus revealed an unexpectedly complex evolutionary history involving multiple sympatric and parapatric mtDNA clades across northern Australia. These phylogeographic patterns highlight the importance of investigating genetic variation across distributions of species and integrating this information into biodiversity conservation.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/ece3.2381
Field of Research 060309 Phylogeny and Comparative Analysis
060302 Biogeography and Phylogeography
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089740

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