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Antecedents, work-related consequences, and buffers of job burnout among Indian software developers

Singh, Pankaj, Suar, Damodar and Leiter, Michael P. 2012, Antecedents, work-related consequences, and buffers of job burnout among Indian software developers, Journal of leadership and organizational studies, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 83-104, doi: 10.1177/1548051811429572.

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Title Antecedents, work-related consequences, and buffers of job burnout among Indian software developers
Author(s) Singh, Pankaj
Suar, Damodar
Leiter, Michael P.ORCID iD for Leiter, Michael P. orcid.org/0000-0001-5680-0363
Journal name Journal of leadership and organizational studies
Volume number 19
Issue number 1
Start page 83
End page 104
Total pages 22
Publisher Sage Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1548-0518
1939-7089
Keyword(s) job burnout
professional efficacy
software developers
yoga and meditation
India
Summary This study examines the antecedents, consequences, and buffers of job burnout among software developers using job demands resources theory. Data were collected from 372 software developers in India using questionnaires. Results reveal that software developers experiencing more role ambiguity, role conflict, schedule pressure, irregular shifts, group noncooperation, psychological contract violation, and work-family conflict are at a greater risk of job burnout. The most important antecedent of job burnout was found to be work-family conflict. Job burnout increased job performance but decreased organizational commitment and interpersonal relationships. Subjective well-being and practicing yoga and meditation were inversely related to burnout-linked job performance. Subjective well-being, social support, and practicing yoga and meditation were also found to decrease the adverse association of job burnout with organizational commitment and interpersonal relationships. In the context of work-related consequences, job burnout had the biggest adverse association with organizational commitment, and practicing yoga and meditation was found to be the most influential buffer to counter the adverse consequences of job burnout.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/1548051811429572
Field of Research 149999 Economics not elsewhere classified
1499 Other Economics
1503 Business And Management
Socio Economic Objective 970114 Expanding Knowledge in Economics
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, Baker College
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089753

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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