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Attitudes of Australian heroin users to peer distribution of naloxone for heroin overdose: perspectives on intranasal administration

Kerr, Debra, Dietze, Paul, Kelly, Anee-Maree and Jolley, Damien 2008, Attitudes of Australian heroin users to peer distribution of naloxone for heroin overdose: perspectives on intranasal administration, Journal of urban health, vol. 85, no. 3, pp. 352-360, doi: 10.1007/s11524-008-9273-z.

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Title Attitudes of Australian heroin users to peer distribution of naloxone for heroin overdose: perspectives on intranasal administration
Author(s) Kerr, DebraORCID iD for Kerr, Debra orcid.org/0000-0002-2956-2432
Dietze, Paul
Kelly, Anee-Maree
Jolley, Damien
Journal name Journal of urban health
Volume number 85
Issue number 3
Start page 352
End page 360
Total pages 9
Publisher Springer
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2008-05
ISSN 1099-3460
1468-2869
Keyword(s) naloxone
heroin
overdose
intranasal
Summary Naloxone distribution to injecting drug users (IDUs) for peer administration is a suggested strategy to prevent fatal heroin overdose. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes of IDUs to administration of naloxone to others after heroin overdose, and preferences for method of administration. A sample of 99 IDUs (median age 35 years, 72% male) recruited from needle and syringe programs in Melbourne were administered a questionnaire. Data collected included demographics, attitudes to naloxone distribution, and preferences for method of administration. The primary study outcomes were attitudes of IDUs to use of naloxone for peer administration (categorized on a five-point scale ranging from "very good idea" to "very bad idea") and preferred mode of administration (intravenous, intramuscular, and intranasal). The majority of the sample reported positive attitudes toward naloxone distribution (good to very good idea: 89%) and 92% said they were willing to participate in a related training program. Some participants raised concerns about peer administration including the competence of IDUs to administer naloxone in an emergency, victim response on wakening and legal implications. Most (74%) preferred intranasal administration in comparison to other administration methods (21%). There was no association with age, sex, or heroin practice. There appears to be strong support among Australian IDU for naloxone distribution to peers. Intranasal spray is the preferred route of administration.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s11524-008-9273-z
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2008, New York Academy of Medicine
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089876

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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