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Destruction of heritage or secular iconoclasm? The case of Dampier Archipelago Rock Art

Gonzalez Zarandona, Jose Antonio 2014, Destruction of heritage or secular iconoclasm? The case of Dampier Archipelago Rock Art, in CIHA 2012 : Proceedings of the 33rd Congress of the International Committee of the History of Art : CIHA as the Object of Art History : The Challenge of the Object, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany, pp. 21-25.

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Title Destruction of heritage or secular iconoclasm? The case of Dampier Archipelago Rock Art
Author(s) Gonzalez Zarandona, Jose AntonioORCID iD for Gonzalez Zarandona, Jose Antonio orcid.org/0000-0002-3655-5898
Conference name CIHA as the Object of Art History', The Challenge of the object. Congress of the International Committee of the HIstory of Art (33rd : 2012 : Nurnberg, Germany)
Conference location Nürnberg , Germany
Conference dates 2012/07/15 - 2012/07/20
Title of proceedings CIHA 2012 : Proceedings of the 33rd Congress of the International Committee of the History of Art : CIHA as the Object of Art History : The Challenge of the Object
Editor(s) Grossmann, G. Ulrich
Publication date 2014
Series CIHA as the Object of Art History', The Challenge of the object
Start page 21
End page 25
Total pages 5
Publisher Germanisches Nationalmuseum
Place of publication Nürnberg, Germany
Summary The Dampier Archipelago (Western Australia) consists of 42 islands;Dampier Island is the largest. After large deposits of iron orewere discovered in the 1960s, and the ban to export it was lifted inDecember 1960, several companies were established in the area.Two towns were built: Dampier (1965) and Karratha (1968) toaccommodate the growing population. An artiÀ cial causeway wasbuilt to connect the island to the mainland. The area was chosento host the industrial facilities to process the iron ore, instead ofDepuch Island, located 100 km north of the archipelago. To somethis decision is the reason that between 5% and 25% of the rock arthas been already destroyed or removed due to industrial action.1Removal is the same as destruction, as rock art should always remainin situ in order to convey its meaning. In 1979 the name waschanged to Burrup Peninsula, as it is known today. Its Aboriginalname is Murujuga, which means »hip bone sticks out.«McDonald and Veth believe that up to 2004, less than 14% of landon the peninsula had been impacted.2 The government of WesternAustralia, through the Department of Indigenous AɆ airs, acknowledgesthat between 1972 and 2005, 7.2% petroglyphs (engravingsmade onto the boulders) and 4% of Aboriginal sites3 have beendestroyed, while 1682 petroglyphs and 119 sites have been relocated.On the other hand, up to 2008 more than 3000 Aboriginal siteshad been registered at the Department of Aboriginal AɆ airs. It isarguably the »largest rock art site in the world;« allegedly it containsup to one million petroglyphs.
ISBN 3936688648
978-3936688641
Language eng
Field of Research 200201 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Studies
HERDC Research category EN.1 Other conference paper
Copyright notice ©2014, The Author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089892

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation
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