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Being a girl in wartime: Canadian children's religious magazines during the First World War

Moruzi, Kristine 2015, Being a girl in wartime: Canadian children's religious magazines during the First World War, Australasian Canadian Studies, vol. 32, no. 1-2, Speical issue: Remembrance and representation: Canada, Australia, and New Zealand in World War I, pp. 151-166.

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Title Being a girl in wartime: Canadian children's religious magazines during the First World War
Author(s) Moruzi, KristineORCID iD for Moruzi, Kristine orcid.org/0000-0002-2636-975X
Journal name Australasian Canadian Studies
Volume number 32
Issue number 1-2
Season Speical issue: Remembrance and representation: Canada, Australia, and New Zealand in World War I
Start page 151
End page 166
Total pages 16
Publisher Association for Canadian Studies in Australia and New Zealand
Place of publication Wollongong, N.S.W.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1832-5408
Keyword(s) religious magazines
Canada
feminine idols
war
duty
sacrifice
Summary During the First World War, Canadian children were inducted into certain patterns of behavior based on their symbolic value as the future of Canada and as contributors to the British empire. After the advent of the war, Protestant religious denominations in Canada began using their existing children's publications, such as The King's Own (1900-1925) and Pleasant Hours (1881-1929), to encourage child readers to see the war in ways that reinforced the necessity of duty and sacrifice far both boys and girls. Fiction and correspondence in these publications reflect the magazines' engagement with the war and their efforts to show girls how they could contribute to the war effort. As such, they represent an important intervention into how Canadian girlhood was constructed and refined during wartime. Although girls' fiction in these magazines often emphasises domestic responsibilities, it also offers opportunities to mobilise these domestic skills to support the war effort. Other content within the magazines also presented practical ideas that could be implemented at home and at school, suggesting that girls' participation in the war effort could be easily understood and implemented. Moreover, girls' participation in these wartime activities contributed simultaneously to both national and imperial enterprises. Thus these two magazines represented Canadian feminine ideals within an imperial framework. Importantly, however, the dominant frame far these girlhood ideals is explicitly national. They are primarily understood to be helping Canadians through their wartime work.
Language eng
Field of Research 200506 North American Literature
Socio Economic Objective 950506 Understanding the Past of the Americas
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©[2015, Association for Canadian Studies in Australia and New Zealand]
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089931

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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