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How does exercise reduce the rate of age-associated cognitive decline? A review of potential mechanisms

Kennedy, Greg, Hardman, Roy J., Macpherson, Helen, Scholey, Andrew B. and Pipingas, Andrew 2017, How does exercise reduce the rate of age-associated cognitive decline? A review of potential mechanisms, Journal of alzheimers disease, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.3233/JAD-160665.

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Title How does exercise reduce the rate of age-associated cognitive decline? A review of potential mechanisms
Author(s) Kennedy, Greg
Hardman, Roy J.
Macpherson, HelenORCID iD for Macpherson, Helen orcid.org/0000-0002-3603-9359
Scholey, Andrew B.
Pipingas, Andrew
Journal name Journal of alzheimers disease
Volume number 55
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher IOS Press
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2017
ISSN 1875-8908
Keyword(s) BDNF
cognition
cognitive aging
exercise
inflammation
insulin
stress
vascular
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Neurosciences
Neurosciences & Neurology
CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM
C-REACTIVE PROTEIN
BLOOD-BRAIN-BARRIER
ADULT HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS
FACTOR VAL66MET POLYMORPHISM
LONG-TERM POTENTIATION
WHITE-MATTER HYPERINTENSITIES
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIALS
TYPE-2 DIABETES-MELLITUS
DWELLING OLDER-ADULTS
Summary The rate of age-associated cognitive decline varies considerably between individuals. It is important, both on a societal and individual level, to investigate factors that underlie these differences in order to identify those which might realistically slow cognitive decline. Physical activity is one such factor with substantial support in the literature. Regular exercise can positively influence cognitive ability, reduce the rate of cognitive aging, and even reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. However, while there is substantial evidence in the extant literature for the effect of exercise on cognition, the processes that mediate this relationship are less clear. This review examines cardiovascular health, production of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), insulin sensitivity, stress, and inflammation as potential pathways, via which exercise may maintain or improve cognitive functioning, and may be particularly pertinent in the context of the aging brain. A greater understanding of these mechanisms and their potential relationships with exercise and cognition will be invaluable in providing biomarkers for investigating the efficacy of differing exercise regimes on cognitive outcomes.
Language eng
DOI 10.3233/JAD-160665
Field of Research 110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified
1103 Clinical Sciences
1702 Cognitive Science
1109 Neurosciences
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, IOS Press and the Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090000

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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