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Is it more disgusting if I think about it? Examining the interaction of obsessive beliefs and disgust propensity in clinical obsessive-compulsive disorder

Melli, Gabriele, Moulding, Richard and Poli, Andrea 2016, Is it more disgusting if I think about it? Examining the interaction of obsessive beliefs and disgust propensity in clinical obsessive-compulsive disorder, Journal of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders, vol. 11, pp. 74-81, doi: 10.1016/j.jocrd.2016.09.001.

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Title Is it more disgusting if I think about it? Examining the interaction of obsessive beliefs and disgust propensity in clinical obsessive-compulsive disorder
Author(s) Melli, Gabriele
Moulding, RichardORCID iD for Moulding, Richard orcid.org/0000-0001-7779-3166
Poli, Andrea
Journal name Journal of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders
Volume number 11
Start page 74
End page 81
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-10
ISSN 2211-3649
2211-3657
Keyword(s) Obsessive-compulsivedisorder
OCD
Disgust propensity
Obsessive beliefs
Dysfunctional beliefs
Summary Independent lines of research have identified disgust propensity and obsessive beliefs to be important affective and cognitive processes in contamination symptoms. In non-clinical samples, a previous study integrated these lines of research and found that disgust propensity more strongly predicted two different measures of contamination fears when obsessive beliefs – particularly overestimation of threat – were higher, suggesting that cognitive factors potentiate the role of disgust propensity in contamination fear. The present study aimed to replicate these findings in a sample of 103 patients with OCD. Unexpectedly, while disgust propensity was related to two self-report measures of contamination fears, obsessive beliefs were not. Moderation analyses failed to reveal an interaction between disgust propensity and obsessive beliefs in predicting contamination fear. It is suggested that disgust propensity is more relevant to clinical contamination fears than are obsessive beliefs – either directly or as a moderating factor. Implications for theory and treatment are discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jocrd.2016.09.001
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090020

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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