Pre-hospital and in-hospital parameters and outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury: a comparison between German and Australian trauma registries

Engel, D.C., Mikocka-Walus, A., Cameron, P.A. and Maegele, M. 2010, Pre-hospital and in-hospital parameters and outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury: a comparison between German and Australian trauma registries, Injury, vol. 41, no. 9, pp. 901-906, doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2010.01.002.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Pre-hospital and in-hospital parameters and outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury: a comparison between German and Australian trauma registries
Author(s) Engel, D.C.
Mikocka-Walus, A.ORCID iD for Mikocka-Walus, A. orcid.org/0000-0003-4864-3956
Cameron, P.A.
Maegele, M.
Journal name Injury
Volume number 41
Issue number 9
Start page 901
End page 906
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2010-09
ISSN 0020-1383
1879-0267
Keyword(s) traumatic brain injury
pre-hospital management
emergency medical service system
DOC-ALS
paramedic
trauma registry
Summary INTRODUCTION: In Germany, physician-operated emergency medical services (EMS) manage most pre-hospital trauma care. Australia uses a different EMS system, deploying highly trained paramedics for road and air transport of trauma patients. The effect of these different systems on secondary insults to traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients is unclear. There is conflicting evidence regarding which system is preferable. To add to the body of evidence, we compared the profile of injury, pre-hospital management and outcomes of TBI patients from both populations.

METHODS: Cases aged > or = 16 years, with AIS head > or = 3, AIS other body parts < or = 3, recorded in the Victorian State Trauma Registry (VSTR) and Trauma Registry of the German Society of Trauma Surgery (TR-DGU) from 2002 to 2007 were compared.

RESULTS: 10,183 cases (5665 German, 4518 Australian) were included. No difference in sex or median age was observed. There were major between-registry differences in type of injury, trauma circumstance, intent and severity of injury. German cases sustained more serious injury and received more pre-hospital interventions. Mortality was significantly higher amongst German patients even when adjusted for demographics, injury severity and in- and pre-hospital parameters. German patients had a longer hospital and ICU stay.

CONCLUSION: There were clear differences in injury characteristics and outcomes in TBI patients between Germany and Australia. As differences in coding, data collection and patient selection are evident, firm conclusions regarding the contribution of variations in pre-hospital care are not possible. The differences in outcome deserve further exploration in prospective studies.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.injury.2010.01.002
Field of Research 111716 Preventive Medicine
170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
110305 Emergency Medicine
1103 Clinical Sciences
1110 Nursing
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2010, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090087

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 98 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 23 Jan 2017, 12:45:09 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.