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Evolution and significance of the regeneration reserve heritage landscape of Broken Hill: history, values and significance

Jones, David 2016, Evolution and significance of the regeneration reserve heritage landscape of Broken Hill: history, values and significance, Historic environment, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 40-57.

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Title Evolution and significance of the regeneration reserve heritage landscape of Broken Hill: history, values and significance
Author(s) Jones, DavidORCID iD for Jones, David orcid.org/0000-0003-3990-5520
Journal name Historic environment
Volume number 28
Issue number 1
Start page 40
End page 57
Total pages 18
Publisher Australia ICOMOS
Place of publication Burwood, Vic.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 0726-6715
Summary In 1991, the National Trust of NSW classified the Regeneration Reserves surrounding the City of Broken Hill as an essential cultural heritage asset of the City of Broken Hill, and in 2015 the City of Broken Hill, including the reserves, were elevated to the National Heritage List under the Commonwealth's Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. This tract of land, and its proponents, Albert and Margaret Morris, are recognised as pioneers of arid zone revegetation science in Australia; a point noted in the National Heritage List citation. They created at Broken Hill a unique revegetation ‘greenbelt’ of national ecological, landscape architectural and town planning significance. The Morris’ led the advancement of arid zone botanical investigation and taxonomic inquiry, propagation innovation, and revegetation sciencein the 1920s-40s in Australia and applied this spatially. Their research and practical applications, in crafting the regeneration reserves around Broken Hill, demonstrated the need for landscape harmonisation to occur to reduce erosion and dust damage to human and mining activities alike. This pioneering research and practice informs and underpins much arid zone mine reclamation and revegetation work in Australia today. This paper reviews the historical evolution of this cultural landscape, its integral importance to the cultural heritage and mining history of the City of Broken Hill, and its inclusion as part of the Broken Hill National Heritage List citation.
Language eng
Field of Research 120504 Land Use and Environmental Planning
120107 Landscape Architecture
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Australia ICOMOS
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090112

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.