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Correlates of meal skipping in young adults: a systematic review

Pendergast, Felicity J., Livingstone, Katherine M., Worsley, Anthony and McNaughton, Sarah A. 2016, Correlates of meal skipping in young adults: a systematic review, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 13, Article Number : 125, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1186/s12966-016-0451-1.

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Title Correlates of meal skipping in young adults: a systematic review
Author(s) Pendergast, Felicity J.
Livingstone, Katherine M.ORCID iD for Livingstone, Katherine M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9682-7541
Worsley, AnthonyORCID iD for Worsley, Anthony orcid.org/0000-0002-4635-6059
McNaughton, Sarah A.ORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 13
Season Article Number : 125
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Correlates
Eating behaviour
Meal skipping
Systematic review
Young adults
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
TURKISH UNIVERSITY-STUDENTS
COLLEGE-STUDENTS
NUTRIENT INTAKE
DIETARY HABITS
ENVIRONMENTAL-INFLUENCES
BREAKFAST CONSUMPTION
EATING PATTERNS
WEIGHT STATUS
FOOD-HABITS
US ADULTS
Summary BACKGROUND: Meal skipping rates may be highest during young adulthood, a period of transition and development. Although these dietary behaviours may increase future risk of chronic disease, limited research has investigated correlates of meal skipping in young adults.

METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted to identify studies that investigated correlates of meal skipping behaviours in young adults (aged 18-30 years). EBSCO host, MEDLINE Complete, Global Health, Scopus, EMBASE, Web of Science and Informit platforms were searched for eligible articles. Correlates were defined as any factor that was either associated with meal skipping or was self-reported by the participant to have an influence on meal skipping. Randomised controlled trials, prospective cohort studies, case-control studies, nested case-control studies, cross-sectional studies, and longitudinal studies were eligible for inclusion.

RESULTS: Three-hundred and thirty-one articles were identified, 141 full-text articles assessed for eligibility, resulting in 35 included studies. Multiple methodological and reporting weaknesses were apparent in the reviewed studies with 28 of the 35 studies scoring a negative rating in the risk of bias assessment. Meal skipping (any meal), defined as the skipping of any meal throughout the day, was reported in 12 studies with prevalence ranging between 5 and 83%. The remaining 25 studies identified specific meals and their skipping rates, with breakfast the most frequently skipped meal 14-88% compared to lunch 8-57% and dinner 4-57%. Lack of time was consistently reported as an important correlate of meal skipping, compared with correlates such as cost and weight control, while sex was the most commonly reported associated correlate. Breakfast skipping was more common among men while lunch or dinner skipping being more common among women.

CONCLUSIONS: This review is the first to examine potential correlates of meal skipping in young adults. Future research would benefit from stronger design and reporting strategies, using a standardised approach for measuring and defining meal skipping.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0451-1
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090133

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.