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Psychosocial job quality and mental health among young workers: a fixed-effects regression analysis using 13 waves of annual data

Milner, Allison, Krnjacki, Lauren and LaMontagne, Anthony D 2017, Psychosocial job quality and mental health among young workers: a fixed-effects regression analysis using 13 waves of annual data, Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 50-58, doi: 10.5271/sjweh.3608.

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Title Psychosocial job quality and mental health among young workers: a fixed-effects regression analysis using 13 waves of annual data
Author(s) Milner, Allison
Krnjacki, Lauren
LaMontagne, Anthony DORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Journal name Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health
Volume number 43
Issue number 1
Start page 50
End page 58
Total pages 9
Publisher Nordic Association of Occupational Safety and Health (NOROSH)
Place of publication Helsinki, Finland
Publication date 2017
ISSN 0355-3140
1795-990X
Keyword(s) longitudinal study
mental ill-health
mental well-being
psychosocial working condition
Summary Objectives Entry into employment may be a time when a young person's well-being and mental health is challenged. Specifically, we examined the difference in mental health when a young person was "not in the labor force" (NILF) (ie, non-working activity such as participating in education) compared to being in a job with varying levels of psychosocial quality.

Method The data source for this study was the Household Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) study, and the sample included 10 534 young people (aged ≤30 years). We used longitudinal fixed-effects regression to investigate within-person changes in mental health comparing circumstances where individuals were NILF to when they were employed in jobs of varying psychosocial quality.

Results
Compared to when individuals were not in the labor force, results suggest a statistically significant decline in mental health when young people were employed in jobs with poor psychosocial working conditions and an improvement in mental health when they were employed in jobs with optimal psychosocial working conditions. Our results were robust to various sensitivity tests, including adjustment for life events and the lagged effects of mental health and job stressors.

Conclusions
If causal, the results suggest that improving the psychosocial quality of work for younger workers will protect and promote their wellbeing, and may reduce the likelihood of mental health problems later on.
Language eng
DOI 10.5271/sjweh.3608
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090135

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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