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Effects of living near a new urban motorway on the travel behaviour of local residents in deprived areas: evidence from a natural experimental study

Foley, Louise, Prins, Richard, Crawford, Fiona, Sahlqvist, Shannon and Ogilvie, David 2017, Effects of living near a new urban motorway on the travel behaviour of local residents in deprived areas: evidence from a natural experimental study, Health & place, vol. 43, pp. 57-65, doi: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2016.11.008.

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Title Effects of living near a new urban motorway on the travel behaviour of local residents in deprived areas: evidence from a natural experimental study
Author(s) Foley, Louise
Prins, Richard
Crawford, Fiona
Sahlqvist, ShannonORCID iD for Sahlqvist, Shannon orcid.org/0000-0002-3714-9533
Ogilvie, David
Journal name Health & place
Volume number 43
Start page 57
End page 65
Total pages 9
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherland
Publication date 2017-01
ISSN 1873-2054
Keyword(s) Active travel
Automobiles
Natural experimental study
Road
Transportation
Summary We evaluated the effects of a new motorway built through deprived neighbourhoods on travel behaviour in residents. This natural experiment comprised a longitudinal cohort (n=365) and two cross-sectional samples (baseline n=980; follow-up n=978) recruited in 2005 and 2013. Adults from one of three study areas - surrounding the new motorway (South), an existing motorway (East), or no motorway (North) - completed a previous day travel record. Adjusted two-part regression models examined associations between exposure and outcome. Compared to the North, cohort participants in the South were more likely to undertake travel by any mode (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.0-4.2) at follow-up. Within the South study area, cohort participants living closer to a motorway junction were more likely to travel by any mode at follow-up (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.1-19.7), and cross-sectional participants living closer were more likely to use a car at follow-up (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.1-10.7), compared to those living further away. Overall, the new motorway appeared to promote travel and car use in those living nearby, but did not influence active travel. This may propagate socioeconomic inequalities in non-car owners.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.healthplace.2016.11.008
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
111716 Preventive Medicine
120508 Urban Design
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1604 Human Geography
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090159

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.