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The use of statins for the treatment of depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome

Kim, SW, Bae, KY, Kim, JM, Shin, IS, Hong, YJ, Ahn, Y, Jeong, MH, Berk, M and Yoon, JS 2015, The use of statins for the treatment of depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome, Translational psychiatry, vol. 5, Article number: e620, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1038/tp.2015.116.

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Title The use of statins for the treatment of depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome
Author(s) Kim, SW
Bae, KY
Kim, JM
Shin, IS
Hong, YJ
Ahn, Y
Jeong, MH
Berk, MORCID iD for Berk, M orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Yoon, JS
Journal name Translational psychiatry
Volume number 5
Season Article number: e620
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-08-18
ISSN 2158-3188
Keyword(s) Acute Coronary Syndrome
Citalopram
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder
Double-Blind Method
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
Treatment Outcome
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
PLACEBO-CONTROLLED TRIAL
C-REACTIVE PROTEIN
DOUBLE-BLIND
MAJOR DEPRESSION
CLINICAL-TRIAL
ESCITALOPRAM TREATMENT
DISORDER
RISK
ROSUVASTATIN
INFLAMMATION
Summary This study aimed to investigate the effect of statins for the treatment of depression in individuals with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We used 1-year follow-up data of a 24-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of escitalopram and a naturalistic prospective observational cohort study. Of 446 participants with comorbid depressive disorders and ACS at baseline, 300 participated in a randomised escitalopram trial and the remaining 146 participated in a naturalistic observational study. The participants in the two studies were approached for a 1-year follow-up investigation. Treatment response rates, defined as a ⩾ 50% reduction in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores, were used as the outcome variables. In the escitalopram trial, both HAM-D and BDI response rates were highest in patients taking escitalopram and statins together and lowest in patients receiving neither medication. Logistic regression analyses revealed that statin use was significantly associated with higher response rates on both the HAM-D and BDI at 1 year, whereas no such associations were found for escitalopram. In the naturalistic observational study, the response rates at 1 year did not differ significantly by statin use. Instead, the HAM-D response rate was significantly higher in patients taking lipophilic statins than in those who did not. In conclusion, statins may be effective for the treatment of depression independent of medical status and escitalopram use, and they may potentiate the antidepressant action of serotonergic antidepressants in patients with ACS.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/tp.2015.116
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090258

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.