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A new semi-automated method for assessing avian acoustic networks reveals that juvenile and adult zebra finches have separate calling networks

Fernandez, Marie S.A., Soula, Hedi A., Mariette, Mylene M. and Vignal, Clementine 2016, A new semi-automated method for assessing avian acoustic networks reveals that juvenile and adult zebra finches have separate calling networks, Frontiers in psychology, vol. 7, Article Number : 1816, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01816.

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Title A new semi-automated method for assessing avian acoustic networks reveals that juvenile and adult zebra finches have separate calling networks
Author(s) Fernandez, Marie S.A.
Soula, Hedi A.
Mariette, Mylene M.
Vignal, Clementine
Journal name Frontiers in psychology
Volume number 7
Season Article Number : 1816
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2016-11
ISSN 1664-1078
Keyword(s) acoustic communication
conversation rules
development
ontogeny
songbird
turn-taking
vocal interactions
Social Sciences
Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Psychology
TAENIOPYGIA-GUTTATA
SEXUAL SELECTION
SOCIAL NETWORKS
FEMALE
COMMUNICATION
COURTSHIP
DYNAMICS
IMPACT
VOCALIZATIONS
Summary Social networks are often inferred from spatial associations, but other parameters like acoustic communication are likely to play a central role in within group interactions. However, it is currently difficult to determine which individual initiates vocalizations, or who responds to whom. To this aim, we designed a method that allows analyzing group vocal network while controlling for spatial networks, by positioning each group member in equidistant individual cages and analyzing continuous vocal interactions semi-automatically. We applied this method to two types of zebra finch groups, composed of either two adult females and two juveniles, or four young adults (juveniles from the first groups). Young often co-occur in the same social group as adults but are likely to have a different social role, which may be reflected in their vocal interactions. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the social structure of the group influences the parameters of the group vocal network. We found that groups including juveniles presented periods with higher level of activity than groups composed of young adults. Using two types of analyses (Markov analysis and cross-correlation), we showed that juveniles as well as adults were more likely to respond to individuals of their own age-class (i.e. to call one after another, in terms of turn-taking, and within a short time-window, in terms of time delay). When juveniles turned into adulthood, they showed adult characteristics of vocal patterns. Together our results suggest that vocal behavior changes during ontogeny, and individuals are more strongly connected with individuals of the same age-class within acoustic networks.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01816
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090388

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