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Somewhat saved : a captive breeding programme for two endemic Christmas Island lizard species, now extinct in the wild

Andrew, Paul, Cogger, Hal, Driscoll, Don, Flakus, Samantha, Harlow, Peter, Maple, Dion, Misso, Mike, Pink, Caitlin, Retallick, Kent, Rose, Karrie, Tiernan, Brendan, West, Judy and Woinarski, John C.Z. 2016, Somewhat saved : a captive breeding programme for two endemic Christmas Island lizard species, now extinct in the wild, Oryx : the journal of the Fauna Preservation Society, First view, pp. 1-4, doi: 10.1017/S0030605316001071.

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Title Somewhat saved : a captive breeding programme for two endemic Christmas Island lizard species, now extinct in the wild
Author(s) Andrew, Paul
Cogger, Hal
Driscoll, DonORCID iD for Driscoll, Don orcid.org/0000-0002-1560-5235
Flakus, Samantha
Harlow, Peter
Maple, Dion
Misso, Mike
Pink, Caitlin
Retallick, Kent
Rose, Karrie
Tiernan, Brendan
West, Judy
Woinarski, John C.Z.
Journal name Oryx : the journal of the Fauna Preservation Society
Season First view
Start page 1
End page 4
Total pages 4
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 0030-6053
1365-3008
Keyword(s) Christmas Island
extinction
gecko
Indian Ocean
reintroduction
skink
Summary As with many islands, Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean has suffered severe biodiversity loss. Its terrestrial lizard fauna comprised five native species, of which four were endemic. These were abundant until at least the late 1970s, but four species declined rapidly thereafter and were last reported in the wild between 2009 and 2013. In response to the decline, a captive breeding programme was established in August 2009. This attempt came too late for the Christmas Island forest skink Emoia nativitatis, whose last known individual died in captivity in 2014, and for the non-endemic coastal skink Emoia atrocostata. However, two captive populations are now established for Lister's gecko Lepidodactylus listeri and the blue-tailed skink Cryptoblepharus egeriae. The conservation future for these two species is challenging: reintroduction will not be possible until the main threats are identified and controlled.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0030605316001071
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
060299 Ecology not elsewhere classified
0502 Environmental Science And Management
0602 Ecology
0608 Zoology
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Fauna & Flora International
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090399

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