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Implementing peer learning in clinical education: a framework to address challenges in the "real world"

Tai, Joanna Hong Meng, Canny, Benedict J., Haines, Terry P. and Molloy, Elizabeth K. 2016, Implementing peer learning in clinical education: a framework to address challenges in the "real world", Teaching and learning in medicine, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1080/10401334.2016.1247000.

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Title Implementing peer learning in clinical education: a framework to address challenges in the "real world"
Author(s) Tai, Joanna Hong Meng
Canny, Benedict J.
Haines, Terry P.
Molloy, Elizabeth K.
Journal name Teaching and learning in medicine
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2016-12-20
ISSN 1532-8015
Keyword(s) peer learning
challenges in clinical education
qualitative research
Summary Phenomenon: Peer learning has many benefits and can assist students in gaining the educational skills required in future years when they become teachers themselves. Peer learning may be particularly useful in clinical learning environments, where students report feeling marginalized, overwhelmed, and unsupported. Educational interventions often fail in the workplace environment, as they are often conceived in the "ideal" rather than the complex, messy real world. This work sought to explore barriers and facilitators to implementing peer learning activities in a clinical curriculum. APPROACH: Previous peer learning research results and a matrix of empirically derived peer learning activities were presented to local clinical education experts to generate discussion around the realities of implementing such activities. Potential barriers and limitations of and strategies for implementing peer learning in clinical education were the focus of the individual interviews. FINDINGS: Thematic analysis of the data identified three key considerations for real-world implementation of peer learning: culture, epistemic authority, and the primacy of patient-centered care. Strategies for peer learning implementation were also developed from themes within the data, focusing on developing a culture of safety in which peer learning could be undertaken, engaging both educators and students, and establishing expectations for the use of peer learning. Insights: This study identified considerations and strategies for the implementation of peer learning activities, which took into account both educator and student roles. Reported challenges were reflective of those identified within the literature. The resultant framework may aid others in anticipating implementation challenges. Further work is required to test the framework's application in other contexts and its effect on learner outcomes.
Notes In Press
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/10401334.2016.1247000
Field of Research 130209 Medicine, Nursing and Health Curriculum and Pedagogy
130202 Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
1115 Pharmacology And Pharmaceutical Sciences
1302 Curriculum And Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 930102 Learner and Learning Processes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Taylor & Francis Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090460

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Research in Assessment and Digital Learning (CRADLE)
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