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Exercise and Sports Science Australia (ESSA) position statement on exercise prescription for the prevention and management of osteoporosis

Beck, Belinda R., Daly, Robin M., Fiatarone Singh, Maria A. and Taaffe, Dennis R. 2017, Exercise and Sports Science Australia (ESSA) position statement on exercise prescription for the prevention and management of osteoporosis, Journal of science and medicine in sport, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 438-445, doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2016.10.001.

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Title Exercise and Sports Science Australia (ESSA) position statement on exercise prescription for the prevention and management of osteoporosis
Author(s) Beck, Belinda R.
Daly, Robin M.ORCID iD for Daly, Robin M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9897-1598
Fiatarone Singh, Maria A.
Taaffe, Dennis R.
Journal name Journal of science and medicine in sport
Volume number 20
Issue number 5
Start page 438
End page 445
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2017-05
ISSN 1878-1861
Keyword(s) Ageing
Balance
Bone
Exercise guidelines
Falls
Fracture prevention
Muscle
Osteopenia
Physical activity
Summary OBJECTIVES: Osteoporotic fractures are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Although exercise has long been recommended for the prevention and management of osteoporosis, existing guidelines are often non-specific and do not account for individual differences in bone health, fracture risk and functional capacity. The aim of the current position statement is to provide health practitioners with specific, evidence-based guidelines for safe and effective exercise prescription for the prevention or management of osteoporosis, accommodating a range of potential comorbidities.

DESIGN: Position statement.

METHODS: Interpretation and application of research reports describing the effects of exercise interventions for the prevention and management of low bone mass, osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture.

RESULTS: Evidence from animal and human trials indicates that bone responds positively to impact activities and high intensity progressive resistance training. Furthermore, the optimisation of muscle strength, balance and mobility minimises the risk of falls (and thereby fracture), which is particularly relevant for individuals with limited functional capacity and/or a very high risk of osteoporotic fracture. It is important that all exercise programs be accompanied by sufficient calcium and vitamin D, and address issues of comorbidity and safety. For example, loaded spine flexion is not recommended, and impact activities may require modification in the presence of osteoarthritis or frailty.

CONCLUSIONS: Specific guidelines for safe and effective exercise for bone health are presented. Individual exercise prescription must take into account existing bone health status, co-morbidities, and functional or clinical risk factors for falls and fracture.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2016.10.001
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920116 Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Sports Medicine Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090518

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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