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Renal dysfunction in early adulthood following birth asphyxia in male spiny mice, and its amelioration by maternal creatine supplementation during pregnancy

Ellery, Stacey J., LaRosa, Domenic A., Cullen-McEwen, Luise, Brown, Russell D., Snow, Rod J., Walker, David W., Kett, Michelle M. and Dickinson, Hayley 2016, Renal dysfunction in early adulthood following birth asphyxia in male spiny mice, and its amelioration by maternal creatine supplementation during pregnancy, Pedistric research, In Press, pp. 1-26, doi: 10.1038/pr.2016.268.

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Title Renal dysfunction in early adulthood following birth asphyxia in male spiny mice, and its amelioration by maternal creatine supplementation during pregnancy
Author(s) Ellery, Stacey J.
LaRosa, Domenic A.
Cullen-McEwen, Luise
Brown, Russell D.
Snow, Rod J.ORCID iD for Snow, Rod J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4796-6916
Walker, David W.
Kett, Michelle M.
Dickinson, Hayley
Journal name Pedistric research
Season In Press
Start page 1
End page 26
Total pages 26
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Baltimore, Md.
Publication date 2016-12-20
ISSN 1530-0447
Summary BACKGROUND: Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) affects ~70% of asphyxiated newborns, and increases their risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) later in life. AKI is driven by renal oxygen deprivation during asphyxia, thus we hypothesized that creatine administered antenatally would protect the kidney from the long-term effects of birth asphyxia.

METHODS: Pregnant spiny mice were fed standard chow or chow supplemented with 5% creatine from 20-days gestation (mid-getstation). One day prior to term (37-days gestation), pups were delivered by caesarean or subjected to intrauterine asphyxia. Litters were allocated to one of two time-points. Kidneys were collected at one month of age to estimate nephron number (stereology). Renal function (excretory profile and GFR) was measured at three months of age, and kidneys then collected for assessment of glomerulosclerosis.

RESULTS: Compared to controls, at one month of age male (but not female) birth-asphyxia offspring had 20% fewer nephrons (P<0.05). At three months of age male birth-asphyxia offspring had 31% lower GFR (P<0.05) and greater glomerular collagen IV content (P<0.01). Antenatal creatine prevented these renal injuries arising from birth asphyxia.

CONCLUSION: Maternal creatine supplementation during pregnancy may be an effective prophylactic to prevent birth asphyxia induced AKI and the emergence of CKD.Pediatric Research (2016); doi:10.1038/pr.2016.268.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/pr.2016.268
Field of Research 111404 Reproduction
1114 Paediatrics And Reproductive Medicine
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, International Pediatric Research Foundation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090533

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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