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Tumor talk and child-well being: perceptions of 'good' and 'bad' news among parents of children with advanced cancer

Feraco, Angela M., Dussel, Veronica, Orellana, Liliana, Kang, Tammy I., Geyer, J. Russell, Rosenberg, Abby R., Feudtner, Chris and Wolfe, Joanne 2017, Tumor talk and child-well being: perceptions of 'good' and 'bad' news among parents of children with advanced cancer, Journal of pain and symptom management, In Press, pp. 1-29, doi: 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2016.11.013.

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Title Tumor talk and child-well being: perceptions of 'good' and 'bad' news among parents of children with advanced cancer
Author(s) Feraco, Angela M.
Dussel, Veronica
Orellana, Liliana
Kang, Tammy I.
Geyer, J. Russell
Rosenberg, Abby R.
Feudtner, Chris
Wolfe, Joanne
Journal name Journal of pain and symptom management
Season In Press
Start page 1
End page 29
Total pages 29
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2017-01-03
ISSN 1873-6513
Keyword(s) Advanced Childhood Cancer
Bad News
Good News
Hope
Parental Perceptions
Tumor Talk
Summary CONTEXT: Little is known about how parents of children with advanced cancer classify news they receive about their child's medical condition.

OBJECTIVE: To develop concepts of "good news" and "bad news" in discussions of advanced childhood cancer from parent perspectives.

METHODS: Parents of children with advanced cancer cared for at three children's hospitals were asked to share details of conversations in the preceding 3 months that contained "good news" or "bad news" related to their child's medical condition. We used mixed methods to evaluate parent responses to both open-ended and fixed response items.

RESULTS: Of 104 enrolled parents, 86 (83%) completed the survey. Six (7%) parents reported discussing neither good nor bad news, 18 (21%) reported only bad news, 15 (17%) reported only good news, and 46 (54%) reported both good and bad news (1 missing response). Seventy-six parents (88%) answered free response items. Descriptions of both good and bad news discussions consisted predominantly of "tumor talk" or cancer control. Additional treatment options featured prominently, particularly in discussions of bad news (42%). Child well-being, an important good news theme, encompassed treatment tolerance, symptom reduction, and quality of life.

CONCLUSION: A majority of parents of children with advanced cancer report discussing both good and bad news in the preceding 3 months. While news related primarily to cancer control, parents also describe good news discussions related to their child's well-being. Understanding how parents of children with advanced cancer classify and describe the news they receive may enhance efforts to promote family-centered communication.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2016.11.013
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
11 Medical And Health Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090536

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Faculty of Health
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