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Plasmodium falciparum nucleosomes exhibit reduced stability and lost sequence dependent nucleosome positioning

Silberhorn, Elisabeth, Schwartz, Uwe, Löffler, Patrick, Schmitz, Samuel, Symelka, Anne, de Koning-Ward, Tania, Merkl, Rainer and Längst, Gernot 2016, Plasmodium falciparum nucleosomes exhibit reduced stability and lost sequence dependent nucleosome positioning, PLoS pathogens, vol. 12, no. 12, pp. 1-29, doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1006080.

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Title Plasmodium falciparum nucleosomes exhibit reduced stability and lost sequence dependent nucleosome positioning
Author(s) Silberhorn, Elisabeth
Schwartz, Uwe
Löffler, Patrick
Schmitz, Samuel
Symelka, Anne
de Koning-Ward, Tania
Merkl, Rainer
Längst, Gernot
Journal name PLoS pathogens
Volume number 12
Issue number 12
Start page 1
End page 29
Total pages 29
Publisher Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2016-12-29
ISSN 1553-7374
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Microbiology
Parasitology
Virology
HUMAN MALARIA PARASITE
CHICKEN ERYTHROCYTE CHROMATIN
HISTONE OCTAMER
CORE PARTICLES
REGULATORY SEQUENCES
IN-VITRO
DNA
TRANSCRIPTION
EXPRESSION
OCCUPANCY
Summary The packaging and organization of genomic DNA into chromatin represents an additional regulatory layer of gene expression, with specific nucleosome positions that restrict the accessibility of regulatory DNA elements. The mechanisms that position nucleosomes in vivo are thought to depend on the biophysical properties of the histones, sequence patterns, like phased di-nucleotide repeats and the architecture of the histone octamer that folds DNA in 1.65 tight turns. Comparative studies of human and P. falciparum histones reveal that the latter have a strongly reduced ability to recognize internal sequence dependent nucleosome positioning signals. In contrast, the nucleosomes are positioned by AT-repeat sequences flanking nucleosomes in vivo and in vitro. Further, the strong sequence variations in the plasmodium histones, compared to other mammalian histones, do not present adaptations to its AT-rich genome. Human and parasite histones bind with higher affinity to GC-rich DNA and with lower affinity to AT-rich DNA. However, the plasmodium nucleosomes are overall less stable, with increased temperature induced mobility, decreased salt stability of the histones H2A and H2B and considerable reduced binding affinity to GC-rich DNA, as compared with the human nucleosomes. In addition, we show that plasmodium histone octamers form the shortest known nucleosome repeat length (155bp) in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the biochemical properties of the parasite histones are distinct from the typical characteristics of other eukaryotic histones and these properties reflect the increased accessibility of the P. falciparum genome.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.ppat.1006080
Field of Research 0605 Microbiology
1107 Immunology
1108 Medical Microbiology
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Silberhorn et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090654

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.