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Severe hypoglycemia, impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, and self-monitoring in adults with type 1 diabetes: results from Diabetes MILES-Australia

Hendrieckx, Christel, Hagger, Virginia, Jenkins, Alicia, Skinner, Timothy Chas, Pouwer, Frans and Speight, Jane 2016, Severe hypoglycemia, impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, and self-monitoring in adults with type 1 diabetes: results from Diabetes MILES-Australia, Journal of diabetes and its complications, In Press, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2016.11.013.

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Title Severe hypoglycemia, impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, and self-monitoring in adults with type 1 diabetes: results from Diabetes MILES-Australia
Author(s) Hendrieckx, Christel
Hagger, Virginia
Jenkins, Alicia
Skinner, Timothy Chas
Pouwer, Frans
Speight, Jane
Journal name Journal of diabetes and its complications
Season In Press
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1873-460X
Keyword(s) Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia
Self-monitoring of blood glucose
Severe hypoglycemia
Symptom recognition
Type 1 diabetes
Summary AIMS: To assess prevalence of severe hypoglycemia, awareness and symptoms of hypoglycemia, and their associations with self-monitoring of blood glucose.

METHODS: Diabetes MILES-Australia Study participants completed validated questionnaires and study-specific items.

RESULTS: Of 642 adults with type 1 diabetes, 21% reported ≥1 severe hypoglycemic event in the past six months, and 21% reported impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH). Severe hypoglycemia was increased four-fold for those with IAH compared with intact awareness (1.4±3.9 versus 0.3±1.0). Of those with IAH, 92% perceived autonomic and 88% neuroglycopenic symptoms, albeit at lower glucose thresholds compared to people with intact awareness. Those with IAH were more likely to perceive both symptom types at the same glucose level or to perceive neuroglycopenic symptoms first (all p<0.001). Eighteen percent with IAH treated hypoglycemia only when they perceived symptoms and another 18% only when their capillary glucose was <3.0mmol/L.

CONCLUSIONS: One in five adults with type 1 diabetes had IAH or experienced severe hypoglycemia in the past sixmonths. Total loss of hypoglycemia symptoms was rare; most people with IAH retained autonomic symptoms, perceived at relatively low glucose levels. Frequent self-monitoring of blood glucose prompted early recognition and treatment of hypoglycemia, suggesting severe hypoglycemia risk can be minimized.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2016.11.013
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090667

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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