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Currency and competence of occupational therapists and consumers with rapidly changing technology

Steel, Emily J, Buchanan, Ricky, Layton, Natasha and Wilson, Erin 2017, Currency and competence of occupational therapists and consumers with rapidly changing technology, Occupational therapy international, vol. 2017, pp. 1-5, doi: 10.1155/2017/5612843.

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Title Currency and competence of occupational therapists and consumers with rapidly changing technology
Author(s) Steel, Emily J
Buchanan, Ricky
Layton, Natasha
Wilson, ErinORCID iD for Wilson, Erin orcid.org/0000-0001-6417-7276
Journal name Occupational therapy international
Volume number 2017
Article ID 5612843
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Place of publication Cairo, Egypt
Publication date 2017-01-12
ISSN 0966-7903
1557-0703
Keyword(s) occupational therapy
occupational therapists
assistive technology
environmental control systems
rehabilitation
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Summary Assistive technology was once a specialised field of practice, involving products designed for populations with specific impairments or functional goals. In Australia, occupational therapists have, at times, functioned as gatekeepers to public funding, prescribing products from a predefined list. An expanding range of accessible mainstream products available via international and online markets has changed the meaning and application of assistive technology for many people with disability. In the policy context of consumer choice and cost-effectiveness, have occupational therapists been left behind? This paper describes the change in context for access to assistive technology resulting in expanded possibilities for participation and inclusion. A case study of environmental control systems is used to explore the overlap of mainstream and assistive products and the funding and services to support their uptake. The analysis describes a future policy and practice context in which assistive technology includes a spectrum of products decoupled from access to independent advice and support services. A broader scope of occupational therapy practice has potential to enhance the occupational rights of people with disability and the efficiency and effectiveness of assistive technology provision.
Language eng
DOI 10.1155/2017/5612843
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090703

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.