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Comparative genomics of the Listeria monocytogenes ST204 subgroup

Fox, Edward M., Allnutt, Theodore, Bradbury, Mark I., Fanning, Séamus and Chandry, P. Scott 2016, Comparative genomics of the Listeria monocytogenes ST204 subgroup, Frontiers in microbiology, vol. 7, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2016.02057.

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Title Comparative genomics of the Listeria monocytogenes ST204 subgroup
Formatted title Comparative genomics of the Listeria monocytogenes ST204 subgroup
Author(s) Fox, Edward M.
Allnutt, Theodore
Bradbury, Mark I.
Fanning, Séamus
Chandry, P. Scott
Journal name Frontiers in microbiology
Volume number 7
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2016-12
ISSN 1664-302X
Keyword(s) Listeria monocytogenes
MLST
ST204
comparative genomics
plasmid
whole genome sequencing
Summary The ST204 subgroup of Listeria monocytogenes is among the most frequently isolated in Australia from a range of environmental niches. In this study we provide a comparative genomics analysis of food and food environment isolates from geographically diverse sources. Analysis of the ST204 genomes showed a highly conserved core genome with the majority of variation seen in mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons and phage insertions. Most strains (13/15) harbored plasmids, which although varying in size contained highly conserved sequences. Interestingly 4 isolates contained a conserved plasmid of 91,396 bp. The strains examined were isolated over a period of 12 years and from different geographic locations suggesting plasmids are an important component of the genetic repertoire of this subgroup and may provide a range of stress tolerance mechanisms. In addition to this 4 phage insertion sites and 2 transposons were identified among isolates, including a novel transposon. These genetic elements were highly conserved across isolates that harbored them, and also contained a range of genetic markers linked to stress tolerance and virulence. The maintenance of conserved mobile genetic elements in the ST204 population suggests these elements may contribute to the diverse range of niches colonized by ST204 isolates. Environmental stress selection may contribute to maintaining these genetic features, which in turn may be co-selecting for virulence markers relevant to clinical infection with ST204 isolates.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fmicb.2016.02057
Field of Research 060408 Genomics
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090756

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.