You are not logged in.

When ethical leader behavior breaks bad: how ethical leader behavior can turn abusive via ego depletion and moral licensing

Lin, Szu-Han (Joanna), Ma, Jingjing and Johnson, Russell E. 2016, When ethical leader behavior breaks bad: how ethical leader behavior can turn abusive via ego depletion and moral licensing, Journal of applied psychology, vol. 101, no. 6, pp. 815-830, doi: 10.1037/apl0000098.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title When ethical leader behavior breaks bad: how ethical leader behavior can turn abusive via ego depletion and moral licensing
Author(s) Lin, Szu-Han (Joanna)
Ma, Jingjing
Johnson, Russell E.
Journal name Journal of applied psychology
Volume number 101
Issue number 6
Start page 815
End page 830
Total pages 16
Publisher American Psychological Association
Place of publication Washington, D.C.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 0021-9010
1939-1854
Keyword(s) ethical leader behaviour
abusive leader behaviour
ego depletion
moral licensing
Summary The literature to date has predominantly focused on the benefits of ethical leader behaviors for recipients (e.g., employees and teams). Adopting an actor-centric perspective, in this study we examined whether exhibiting ethical leader behaviors may come at some cost to leaders. Drawing from ego depletion and moral licensing theories, we explored the potential challenges of ethical leader behavior for actors. Across 2 studies which employed multiwave designs that tracked behaviors over consecutive days, we found that leaders’ displays of ethical behavior were positively associated with increases in abusive behavior the following day. This association was mediated by increases in depletion and moral credits owing to their earlier displays of ethical behavior. These results suggest that attention is needed to balance the benefits of ethical leader behaviors for recipients against the challenges that such behaviors pose for actors, which include feelings of mental fatigue and psychological license and ultimately abusive interpersonal behaviors.
Language eng
DOI 10.1037/apl0000098
Field of Research 150310 Organisation and Management Theory
1701 Psychology
1503 Business And Management
1505 Marketing
Socio Economic Objective 910402 Management
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, American Psychological Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090788

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Department of Management
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 30 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 25 Jan 2017, 12:19:16 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.