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Lifestyle behaviours associated with 5-year weight gain in a prospective cohort of Australian adults aged 26-36 years at baseline

Smith, Kylie J., Gall, Seana L., McNaughton, Sarah A., Cleland, Verity J., Otahal, Petr, Dwyer, Terence and Venn, Alison J. 2017, Lifestyle behaviours associated with 5-year weight gain in a prospective cohort of Australian adults aged 26-36 years at baseline, BMC public health, vol. 17, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-3931-y.

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Title Lifestyle behaviours associated with 5-year weight gain in a prospective cohort of Australian adults aged 26-36 years at baseline
Author(s) Smith, Kylie J.
Gall, Seana L.
McNaughton, Sarah A.ORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Cleland, Verity J.
Otahal, Petr
Dwyer, Terence
Venn, Alison J.
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 17
Article ID 54
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-01-10
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) skipping breakfast
takeaway food
fast food
television
steps
sedentary behaviour
physical activity
guidelines
weight gain
young adults
Summary Background: Whether not meeting common guidelines for lifestyle behaviours is associated with weight gain is uncertain. This study examined whether 5-year weight gain was predicted by not meeting guidelines for: breakfast consumption (eating between 6 and 9 am), takeaway food consumption (<2 times/week), television viewing (<2 h/day) and daily steps (≥10,000 steps/day).

Methods: One thousand one hundred and fifty-five Australian participants (43% men, 26-36 years) completed questionnaires and wore a pedometer at baseline (2004-06) and follow-up (2009-11). Weight was measured or self-reported, with a correction factor applied. For each behaviour, participants were classified according to whether they met the guideline: consistently met at baseline and follow-up (reference group); not met at baseline but met at follow-up; met at baseline but not met at follow-up; consistently not met at baseline and follow-up. For each behaviour, weight gain was calculated using linear regression. Weight gain by number of guidelines met was also examined.

Results: Mean 5-year weight gain was 2.0 kg (SD:6.3). Compared to the reference group, additional weight (mean, 95% CI) was gained among those who did not meet the guideline at follow-up, or consistently did not meet the guideline, for breakfast (1.8 kg, 0.7-2.9; 1.5 kg, 0.1-2.8); takeaway food (2.2 kg, 0.7-3.6; 1.9 kg, 0.7-3.1); watching television (1.9 kg, 0.9-2.9; 1.4 kg, 0.4-2.3); and daily steps (2.6 kg, 1.1-4.04; 1.6 kg, 0.5-2.7). Those who met ≤1 guideline at follow-up gained 3.8 kg (95% CI 2.3-5.3) more than those meeting all guidelines.

Conclusion: Individuals who adopted healthier behaviours between baseline and follow-up had similar weight gain to those who met the guidelines at both time points. Encouraging young adults to meet these simple guidelines may reduce weight gain.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3931-y
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID NHMRC 211316
NHMRC 544923
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090804

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.