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Temporal eating patterns: a latent class analysis approach

Leech, Rebecca M, Worsley, Anthony, Timperio, Anna and McNaughton, Sarah A 2017, Temporal eating patterns: a latent class analysis approach, International journal of behavioral nutrition, vol. 14, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/s12966-016-0459-6.

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Title Temporal eating patterns: a latent class analysis approach
Author(s) Leech, Rebecca M
Worsley, Anthony
Timperio, AnnaORCID iD for Timperio, Anna orcid.org/0000-0002-8773-5012
McNaughton, Sarah AORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition
Volume number 14
Article ID 3
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-01-07
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) chrono-nutrition
eating occasion
eating patterns
latent class analysis
meal timing
meals
snacks
Summary BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that large energy intakes towards the end of the day are associated with adverse health outcomes, however, studies of temporal eating patterns across the day are rare. This study examines the temporal eating patterns of Australian adults using latent class analysis (LCA), as a novel approach.

METHODS: Dietary data (n = 2402 men and n = 2840 women, ≥19 years) from two 24-h recalls collected during the 2011-12 Australian National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey were analyzed. LCA was performed to identify distinct temporal eating patterns based on whether or not an eating occasion (EO) occurred within each hour of the day. F and adjusted-chi(2) tests assessed differences in sociodemographic and eating patterns (e.g., meal, snack and EO frequency) between latent classes.

RESULTS: Three patterns, labelled "Conventional" (men: 43%, women: 41%), "Later lunch" (men: 34%, women: 34%) and "Grazing" (men: 23%, women: 25%) were identified. Men and women with a "Grazing" pattern were significantly younger (P < 0.001) and a higher proportion were from major cities (P < 0.01) and were not married (men only, P = 0.01), compared to the "Conventional" and "Later lunch" patterns. The "Grazing" pattern was also characterized by a higher EO frequency (P < 0.01) and snack frequency (P < 0.001) and consumption of a higher proportion of total energy intake from snacks but a lower proportion of total energy intake from meals (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: This study identified three distinct temporal eating patterns in adults that varied by age, EO frequency, snack frequency and energy intake pattern. LCA is a useful approach to capture differences in EO timing across the day. Future research should examine associations between temporal eating patterns and health.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0459-6
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
11 Medical And Health Sciences
13 Education
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID NHMRC 1104636
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090805

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.