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Coastal urban and peri-urban Indigenous people’s adaptive capacity to climate change

Low Choy, Darryl, Clarke, Philip, Serrao-Neumann, Silvia, Hales, Robert, Koshade, Olivia and Jones, David 2016, Coastal urban and peri-urban Indigenous people’s adaptive capacity to climate change. In Maheshwari, Basant, Singh, Vijay P. and Thoradeniya, Bhadranie (ed), Balanced urban development: options and strategies for liveable cities, Springer, Cham, Switzerland, pp.441-461, doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-28112-4_27.

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Title Coastal urban and peri-urban Indigenous people’s adaptive capacity to climate change
Author(s) Low Choy, Darryl
Clarke, Philip
Serrao-Neumann, Silvia
Hales, Robert
Koshade, Olivia
Jones, David
Title of book Balanced urban development: options and strategies for liveable cities
Editor(s) Maheshwari, Basant
Singh, Vijay P.
Thoradeniya, Bhadranie
Publication date 2016
Series Water science and technology library
Chapter number 27
Total chapters 35
Start page 441
End page 461
Total pages 21
Publisher Springer
Place of Publication Cham, Switzerland
Keyword(s) planning
climate change
indigenous peoples
peri-urbanization
micro-environmental change
Summary This chapter discusses the adaptive capacity of coastal urban and peri-urban Indigenous People’s to climate change. It is based on the findings of a National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF) funded project that utilised a series of case studies that engaged key representatives from Indigenous organisations in five coastal locations in three states of south-eastern Australia (Low Choy D, Clarke P, Jones D, Serrao-Neumann S, Hales R, Koschade O et al., Aboriginal reconnections: understanding coastal urban and peri-urban Indigenous people’s vulnerability and adaptive capacity to climate change, National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, Gold Coast, 139 pp, 2013). The study has highlighted the social, economic and environmental impacts on urban and peri-urban Indigenous communities inhabiting coastal areas throughout south-eastern Australia. These impacts include a loss of community and environmental assets, such as cultural heritage sites, with significant impacts on their quality of life and the establishment of potential favourable conditions for the spread of plant diseases, weeds and pests. The study also found that opportunities did not readily exist for engagement with climate change adaptation policy and initiatives and this was further exacerbated by acute shortages of qualified/experienced Indigenous members that could represent their communities’ interests in climate change adaptation forums. The evidence emerging from this research clearly demonstrates that Aboriginal people’s consideration of the future, even with the overlay of climate change and the requirements for serious considerations of adaptation, are significantly influenced and dominated by economic aspirations which are seen as fundamental survival strategies for their communities.
ISBN 3319281100
9783319281124
ISSN 0921-092X
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-28112-4_27
Field of Research 120107 Landscape Architecture
050201 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Environmental Knowledge
050101 Ecological Impacts of Climate Change
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category B1 Book chapter
ERA Research output type B Book chapter
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090806

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.