You are not logged in.

Perceptions of organizational politics and employee citizenship behaviors: conscientiousness and self-monitoring as moderators

Chang, Chu-Hsiang, Rosen, Christopher C., Siemieniec, Gina M. and Johnson, Russell E. 2012, Perceptions of organizational politics and employee citizenship behaviors: conscientiousness and self-monitoring as moderators, Journal of business and psychology, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 395-406, doi: 10.1007/s10869-012-9257-6.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Perceptions of organizational politics and employee citizenship behaviors: conscientiousness and self-monitoring as moderators
Author(s) Chang, Chu-Hsiang
Rosen, Christopher C.
Siemieniec, Gina M.
Johnson, Russell E.
Journal name Journal of business and psychology
Volume number 27
Issue number 4
Start page 395
End page 406
Total pages 12
Publisher Springer Science & Business Media
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2012-12
ISSN 0889-3268
1573-353X
Keyword(s) perceptions of organizational politics
organizational citizenship behavior
conscientiousness
self-monitoring
stress
socio-analytic theory
Summary PurposeThe purpose of the study was to examine the joint moderating effects of employees’ conscientiousness and self-monitoring on the relationship between perceptions of organizational politics and organizational citizenship behaviors.Design/Methodology/ApproachData were collected from 139 subordinate–supervisor dyads through networks of business contacts and university alums of a university in the Midwest US.FindingsWe found a significant three-way interaction between perceived politics, conscientiousness, and self-monitoring in predicting citizenship behaviors. High self-monitoring alleviated the negative effects of politics perceptions on the OCB of highly conscientious employees. Conversely, perceived politics was negatively related to the OCB of employees who reported having either low self-monitoring and high conscientiousness or high self-monitoring and low conscientiousness.ImplicationsOur results advance the theoretical understanding of the relationship between perceptions of organizational politics and citizenship behaviors by integrating the occupational stress perspective with social exchange theory within the socio-analytic framework. Evidence suggests that employees with certain combinations of traits (e.g., low self-monitoring and high conscientiousness or high self-monitoring and low conscientiousness) were particularly susceptible to the negative effects of perceived politics. This knowledge may help practitioners identify training needs or motivational strategies to help alleviate the negative effects of perceived politics on employee citizenship behaviors.Originality/ValueThis study is one of the few that took a holistic person-oriented approach when examining the moderating effects of individual traits on the linkages between perceived politics and citizenship behaviors. In addition, we utilized supervisor ratings of citizenship behaviors to overcome concerns associated with common source bias.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s10869-012-9257-6
Field of Research 150310 Organisation and Management Theory
1503 Business And Management
1701 Psychology
1505 Marketing
Socio Economic Objective 910402 Management
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, Springer Science & Business Media
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090832

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Department of Management
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 28 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 25 Jan 2017, 14:38:54 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.