Openly accessible

Patient and nurse preferences for implementation of bedside handover: do they agree? Findings from a discrete choice experiment

Whitty, Jennifer A., Spinks, Jean, Bucknall, Tracey, Tobiano, Georgia and Chaboyer, Wendy 2017, Patient and nurse preferences for implementation of bedside handover: do they agree? Findings from a discrete choice experiment, Health expectations, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 742-750, doi: 10.1111/hex.12513.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
bucknall-patientandnurse-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 537.48KB 62

Title Patient and nurse preferences for implementation of bedside handover: do they agree? Findings from a discrete choice experiment
Author(s) Whitty, Jennifer A.
Spinks, Jean
Bucknall, TraceyORCID iD for Bucknall, Tracey orcid.org/0000-0001-9089-3583
Tobiano, Georgia
Chaboyer, Wendy
Journal name Health expectations
Volume number 20
Issue number 4
Start page 742
End page 750
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2017-08
ISSN 1369-6513
1369-7625
Keyword(s) Communication
Discrete choice experiment
Nursing
Patient safety
Preferences
Summary Objective
To describe and compare patients' and nurses' preferences for the implementation of bedside handover.

Design
Discrete choice experiment describing handover choices using six characteristics: whether the patient is invited to participate; whether a family member/carer/friend is invited; the number of nurses present; the level of patient involvement; the information content; and privacy.

Setting

Two Australian hospitals.

Participants
Adult patients (n=401) and nurses (n=200) recruited from medical wards.

Main outcome measures
Mean importance scores for handover characteristics estimated using mixed multinomial logit regression of the choice data.

Results
Both patient and nurse participants preferred handover at the bedside rather than elsewhere (P<.05). Being invited to participate, supporting strong two-way communication, having a family member/carer/friend present and having two nurses rather than the nursing team present were most important for patients. Patients being invited to participate and supporting strong two-way communication were most important for nurses. However, contrary to patient preferences, having a family member/carer/friend present was not considered important by nurses. Further, while patients expressed a weak preference to have sensitive information handed over quietly at the bedside, nurses expressed a relatively strong preference for handover of sensitive information verbally away from the bedside.

Conclusions
All participants strongly support handover at the bedside and want patients to participate although patient and nurse preferences for various aspects of bedside handover differ. An understanding of these preferences is expected to support recommendations for improving the patient hospital experience and the consistent implementation of bedside handover as a safety initiative.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/hex.12513
Field of Research 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1110 Nursing
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID ARC DP 130100316
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090924

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 160 Abstract Views, 58 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 31 Jan 2017, 14:40:30 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.