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Associations between access to alcohol outlets and alcohol intake and depressive symptoms in women from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Australia

Lamb, Karen E, Thornton, Lukar E, Teychenne, Megan, Milte, Catherine, Cerin, Ester and Ball, Kylie 2017, Associations between access to alcohol outlets and alcohol intake and depressive symptoms in women from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Australia, BMC public health, vol. 17, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12889-017-4022-4.

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Title Associations between access to alcohol outlets and alcohol intake and depressive symptoms in women from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Australia
Author(s) Lamb, Karen EORCID iD for Lamb, Karen E orcid.org/0000-0001-9782-8450
Thornton, Lukar EORCID iD for Thornton, Lukar E orcid.org/0000-0001-8759-8671
Teychenne, MeganORCID iD for Teychenne, Megan orcid.org/0000-0002-7293-8255
Milte, CatherineORCID iD for Milte, Catherine orcid.org/0000-0003-0035-6405
Cerin, Ester
Ball, KylieORCID iD for Ball, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 17
Article ID 83
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 1471-2458
1471-2458
Keyword(s) Alcohol
Alcohol outlet access
Area-level disadvantage
Depressive symptoms
Harmful consumption
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Consumption
Density
Prevalence
Outcomes
Disease
Cohort
Adults
Health
Summary This study examined associations between alcohol outlet access and alcohol intake, depressive symptoms score and risk of depression among women residing in disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Victoria, Australia. Data on depressive symptoms, alcohol intake and socio-demographic characteristics were obtained from a sample of 995 adult women from Victoria, Australia who were surveyed as part of the Resilience in Eating and Activity Despite Inequality (READI) study. The location of all licensed alcohol outlets in Victoria was obtained from the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation. Participant and alcohol outlet addresses were geocoded to calculate individual alcohol outlet access, defined as the number of outlets (all and by sub-type) within 0.4 km and 3 km of participants' homes. Separate regression models with clustered standard errors were fitted to examine associations between access and alcohol intake according to national recommended limits for short- and long-term harm, frequency of consumption above long-term harm guidelines, depressive symptoms score and risk of depression. Odds of consumption within short-term harm guidelines (≤4 drinks on any day) decreased with increasing access within 3 km, irrespective of outlet type. Typically, there was no evidence to support associations between access and consumption above long-term harm guidelines (>2 drinks on any day) unless considering frequency of consumption at this level where results showed decreased odds of 'don't drink' versus frequently drinking above long-term harm guidelines (i.e., >2 drinks at least once per week) with increasing access at either distance. Although there was no evidence of an association between any of the alcohol outlet access measures and depressive symptoms score, odds of being at risk of depression decreased with increasing access within 3 km. This study found some evidence to support an association between increasing alcohol outlet densities of all types and harmful levels of alcohol consumption, and the association appears to be dependent on the distance threshold considered, among women residing in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods within Victoria, Australia. However, higher numbers of alcohol outlets appear to be associated with a slightly lower risk of depression, with further research needed to identify the direction and mechanisms underlying this unintuitive association.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4022-4
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID NHMRC 374241
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30090962

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.