You are not logged in.

This is your stomach speaking: anthropomorphized health messages reduce portion size preferences among the powerless

Newton, Fiona J, Newton, Joshua D and Wong, Jimmy 2017, This is your stomach speaking: anthropomorphized health messages reduce portion size preferences among the powerless, Journal of business research, vol. 75, pp. 229-239, doi: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2016.07.020.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title This is your stomach speaking: anthropomorphized health messages reduce portion size preferences among the powerless
Author(s) Newton, Fiona J
Newton, Joshua D
Wong, Jimmy
Journal name Journal of business research
Volume number 75
Start page 229
End page 239
Total pages 11
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2017-06
ISSN 0148-2963
Keyword(s) Power
Anthropomorphism
Threat
Food
Portion size
Summary As food portion sizes increase, so too does the amount of energy consumed. The purpose of this study was therefore to determine whether the portion size preferences of individuals could be reduced. Across two experiments, this paper shows that a personally threatening health message that has been endorsed by a digestive system featuring anthropomorphic cues can reduce portion size preferences for energy dense foods and beverages, but only among those who feel powerless. This effect emerges because partially anthropomorphizing an internal body system transforms that system into an agent of social influence. The powerless, who are more sensitive to social influence than the powerful, will consequently be more attuned to threatening health information that has been endorsed by this partially anthropomorphized body system, shaping their behavioral preferences. Anthropomorphizing elements of the self may therefore represent a novel means for motivating behavior change.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jbusres.2016.07.020
Field of Research 150502 Marketing Communications
MD Multidisciplinary
Socio Economic Objective 910403 Marketing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, Elsevier Inc
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091000

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Department of Marketing
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 5 Abstract Views, 6 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 06 Apr 2017, 11:28:49 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.