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Does psychological status influence clinical outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other chronic gastroenterological diseases: an observational cohort prospective study

Mikocka-Walus, Antonina, Turnbull, Deborah A., Moulding, Nicole T., Wilson, Ian G., Holtmann, Gerald J. and Andrews, Jane M. 2008, Does psychological status influence clinical outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other chronic gastroenterological diseases: an observational cohort prospective study, BioPsychoSocial medicine, vol. 2, Article number : 11, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/1751-0759-2-11.

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Title Does psychological status influence clinical outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other chronic gastroenterological diseases: an observational cohort prospective study
Author(s) Mikocka-Walus, Antonina
Turnbull, Deborah A.
Moulding, Nicole T.
Wilson, Ian G.
Holtmann, Gerald J.
Andrews, Jane M.
Journal name BioPsychoSocial medicine
Volume number 2
Season Article number : 11
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2008
ISSN 1751-0759
Summary BACKGROUND: Whether there is a temporal relationship between psychological problems and clinical outcomes in patients with diseases of the digestive tract has not been widely researched. Thus, our aims were 1) To observe and compare prospectively clinical outcomes in relation to psychological co-morbidity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and chronic hepatitis C (HCV) and, 2) To test the hypothesis that patients with psychological co-morbidities are less likely to have a satisfactory response to standard treatment at 12 months.

METHODS: Overall, 139 patients were enrolled in this observational cohort prospective study. Over the ensuing year, physical and psychological measures were made at baseline and after 12 months (HADS, SCL90, SF-12 and disease activity measures). A logistic regression was conducted to observe any relationship between baseline characteristics and patients' clinical outcomes after 12 months.

RESULTS: Overall, there was no relationship between psychological status and quality of life at baseline and relapse at 12 months (p > 0.05). However, patients with inactive disease at baseline were at lower risk of relapse after 12 months (OR = 0.046, CI: 0.012-0.178). No significant relationship was found between psychological problems such as depression/anxiety and a total number of relapses in the IBD group. However, interestingly, patients with an active disease at baseline tended to have a greater number of relapses (OR = 3.07, CI: 1.650-5.738) and CD participants were found at lower risk of relapse than UC participants (OR = 0.382, CI: 0.198-0.736).

CONCLUSION: In contrast to previous investigations, this study suggests that there is no temporal relationship between psychological problems at baseline and clinical outcomes over time. Longer and larger prospective studies are needed to better understand this result.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1751-0759-2-11
Field of Research 110307 Gastroenterology and Hepatology
111714 Mental Health
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Science
Socio Economic Objective 920105 Digestive System Disorders
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2008, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091001

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.