You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Psychological problems in gastroenterology outpatients: a South Australian experience. Psychological co-morbidity in IBD, IBS and hepatitis C

Mikocka-Walus, Antonina A., Turnbull, Deborah A., Andrews, Jane M., Moulding, Nicole T., Wilson, Ian G., Harley, Hugh A. J., Hetzel, David J. and Holtmann, Gerald J. 2008, Psychological problems in gastroenterology outpatients: a South Australian experience. Psychological co-morbidity in IBD, IBS and hepatitis C, Clinical practice and epidemiology in mental health, vol. 4, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/1745-0179-4-15.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
mikockawalus-psychologicalproblems-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 353.98KB 8

Title Psychological problems in gastroenterology outpatients: a South Australian experience. Psychological co-morbidity in IBD, IBS and hepatitis C
Author(s) Mikocka-Walus, Antonina A.ORCID iD for Mikocka-Walus, Antonina A. orcid.org/0000-0003-4864-3956
Turnbull, Deborah A.
Andrews, Jane M.
Moulding, Nicole T.
Wilson, Ian G.
Harley, Hugh A. J.
Hetzel, David J.
Holtmann, Gerald J.
Journal name Clinical practice and epidemiology in mental health
Volume number 4
Article ID 15
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2008-05-23
ISSN 1745-0179
Summary BACKGROUND: In independent studies, IBD, IBS and HCV have each been associated with a substantially increased risk of psychological problems such as depression and anxiety and impairment of quality of life compared to the general healthy population. However, the relative psychological burden for each of these diagnoses is unknown as it has never been compared contemporaneously at one institution. Current local data are therefore needed to enable an evidence-based allocation of limited clinical psychological resources. METHODS: Overall, 139 outpatients (64 IBD, 41 HCV, and 34 IBS) were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. The HADS, SCL90, SF-12 and appropriate disease-specific activity measures were administered. Differences between groups were assesed with ANOVA, the Chi-Square test and the independent samples t-test (two-tailed). RESULTS: Each of the three groups had significantly lower quality of life than the general population (p < 0.05). Overall, a total of 58 (42%) participants met HADS screening criteria for anxiety and 26 (19%) participants for depression. The HCV group had a significantly higher prevalence of depression than either of the other groups (HCV = 34%, IBS = 15% and IBD = 11%, p = 0.009). In the SCL90, the three disease groups differed on 7 out of 12 subscales. On each of these subscales, the HCV group were most severely affected and differed most from the general population. CONCLUSION: Patients with these common chronic gastrointestinal diseases have significant impairment of quality of life. Anxiety is a greater problem than depression, although patients with HCV in particular, should be regularly monitored and treated for co-morbid depression. Evaluation of specific psychological interventions targeting anxiety is warranted.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1745-0179-4-15
Field of Research 110307 Gastroenterology and Hepatology
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
111714 Mental Health
1103 Clinical Sciences
1701 Psychology
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920105 Digestive System Disorders
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2008, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091003

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 32 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 13 Abstract Views, 9 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 02 Feb 2017, 08:04:39 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.