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Cross-cultural comparison of consumer pre-purchase decision-making: anti-aging products

Assawavichairoj, Sutthipat and Taghian, Mehdi 2017, Cross-cultural comparison of consumer pre-purchase decision-making: anti-aging products, Asia Pacific journal of marketing and logistics, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 27-46, doi: 10.1108/APJML-01-2016-0002.

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Title Cross-cultural comparison of consumer pre-purchase decision-making: anti-aging products
Author(s) Assawavichairoj, Sutthipat
Taghian, MehdiORCID iD for Taghian, Mehdi orcid.org/0000-0001-6163-6107
Journal name Asia Pacific journal of marketing and logistics
Volume number 29
Issue number 1
Start page 27
End page 46
Total pages 20
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of publication Bingley, Eng.
Publication date 2017-01
ISSN 1355-5855
1758-4248
Keyword(s) culture
cultural values
anti-ageing products
appearance enhancing
self-image
social acceptability
Summary Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cultural differences in female consumers’ motivation to purchase appearance-enhancing products, particularly anti-aging creams. Design/methodology/approach: This study uses a qualitative research design to collect the data. Focus group discussions were used. The participants were selected from Thai and Australian females, 25-45 years old in Melbourne representing the most frequent users of anti-aging products. Findings: The results indicated variations among participants in their motivation to seek a better appearance. The motivation ranged from a combination of striving to achieve an ideal self and a high level of social acceptability through maintaining youthful appearance and improving on the perceived declining youthful appearance. Using anti-aging products turned out to be a means for taking care of oneself, achieving better social acceptability and improving self-image. These key motivations are inspired by the individual’s social condition and from the reactions they receive from others. These motivations are shared by all participants, but within different cultural perspectives. Research limitations/implications: The main limitation is in relation to the true expression of attitudes by respondents, particularly in regard to the discussion of privately held beliefs about self-image, social acceptability and personal appearance. Additionally, the variations between cultural perceptions are only indicative of real differences between collectivist and individualistic cultures. Practical implications: Managers can adopt a cultural framework for understanding their consumers’ motivations to enhance their appearance, formulate more accurately their marketing strategy and activate and satisfy their consumers’ demand and better inform their new product developments. Originality/value: The analysis explains and compares the differences and similarities in female consumers’ motivations for anti-aging product consumption of two fundamentally different cultural value systems.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/APJML-01-2016-0002
Field of Research 150503 Marketing Management (incl Strategy and Customer Relations)
1505 Marketing
1507 Transportation And Freight Services
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Emerald Group Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091009

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Faculty of Business and Law
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