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Overnight care patterns following parental separation: associations with emotion regulation in infants and young children

McIntosh, Jennifer E., Smyth, Bruce M. and Kelaher, Margaret 2013, Overnight care patterns following parental separation: associations with emotion regulation in infants and young children, Journal of family studies, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 224-239, doi: 10.5172/jfs.2013.19.3.224.

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Title Overnight care patterns following parental separation: associations with emotion regulation in infants and young children
Author(s) McIntosh, Jennifer E.
Smyth, Bruce M.
Kelaher, Margaret
Journal name Journal of family studies
Volume number 19
Issue number 3
Start page 224
End page 239
Total pages 16
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2013-12
ISSN 1322-9400
1839-3543
Keyword(s) divorce
custody
infants
children
development
attachment
parenting
Summary Children living in a shared-time parenting arrangement following separation (also known as joint physicalcustody or dual residence) spend equal or near-equal amounts of day and night time with each parent. Little data existregarding developmental sequelae of such arrangements for infants. The current study examined a theoretically drivenquestion: Are there associations between quantum of overnight stays away from a primary resident parent and the infant’ssettledness, or emotion regulation with that parent? Nationally representative parent report data from the LongitudinalStudy of Australian Children (LSAC) were used. Three age bands were studied and three levels of overnight care contrasted.When parenting style, parental confl ict and socio-economic factors were controlled for, greater number of shared overnightstays for the 0–1 year old and the 2–3 year old groups predicted some less settled and poorly regulated behaviours, butnone for the 4–5 year old group. Limits of these data are discussed, including application to the individual case. Findingssuggest emotional regulation within the primary infant–parent relationship is one useful index of infant adjustment toparenting time arrangements.
Language eng
DOI 10.5172/jfs.2013.19.3.224
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1607 Social Work
1608 Sociology
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, eContent Manegement
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091033

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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