Openly accessible

The things they carried: the pathogenic effects of old and new parasites following the intercontinental invasion of the Australian cane toad (Rhinella marina)

Selechnik, D., Rollins, L. A., Brown, G. P., Kelehear, C. and Shine, R. 2017, The things they carried: the pathogenic effects of old and new parasites following the intercontinental invasion of the Australian cane toad (Rhinella marina), International journal for parasitology: parasites and wildlife, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 375-385, doi: 10.1016/j.ijppaw.2016.12.001.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
rollins-thingstheycarried-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.45MB 4

Title The things they carried: the pathogenic effects of old and new parasites following the intercontinental invasion of the Australian cane toad (Rhinella marina)
Formatted title The things they carried: the pathogenic effects of old and new parasites following the intercontinental invasion of the Australian cane toad (Rhinella marina)
Author(s) Selechnik, D.
Rollins, L. A.ORCID iD for Rollins, L. A. orcid.org/0000-0002-3279-7005
Brown, G. P.
Kelehear, C.
Shine, R.
Journal name International journal for parasitology: parasites and wildlife
Volume number 6
Issue number 3
Start page 375
End page 385
Total pages 11
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2017-12
ISSN 2213-2244
Keyword(s) Rhabdias pseudosphaerocephala
Ecoimmunology
Invasion
Enemy release hypothesis
Immune function
Bufo
Pathogen-mediated selection 1
Summary Brought to Australia in 1935 to control agricultural pests (from French Guiana, via Martinique, Barbados, Jamaica, Puerto Rico and Hawai'i), repeated stepwise translocations of small numbers of founders enabled the cane toad (Rhinella marina) to escape many parasites and pathogens from its native range. However, the infective organisms that survived the journey continue to affect the dynamics of the toad in its new environment. In Australia, the native-range lungworm Rhabdias pseudosphaerocephala decreases its host's cardiac capacity, as well as growth and survival, but not rate of dispersal. The lungworm is most prevalent in long-colonised areas within the toads' Australian range, and absent from the invasion front. Several parasites and pathogens of Australian taxa have host-shifted to cane toads in Australia; for example, invasion-front toads are susceptible to spinal arthritis caused by the soil bacterium, Ochrobactrum anthropi. The pentastome Raillietiella frenata has host-shifted to toads and may thereby expand its Australian range due to the continued range expansion of the invasive toads. Spill-over and spill-back of parasites may be detrimental to other host species; however, toads may also reduce parasite loads in native taxa by acting as terminal hosts. We review the impact of the toad's parasites and pathogens on the invasive anuran's biology in Australia, as well as collateral effects of toad-borne parasites and pathogens on other host species in Australia. Both novel and co-evolved pathogens and parasites may have played significant roles in shaping the rapid evolution of immune system responses in cane toads within their invaded range.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.ijppaw.2016.12.001
Field of Research 060299 Ecology not elsewhere classified
060307 Host-Parasite Interactions
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID ARC FL120100074
ARC DE150101393
Copyright notice ©2016, Crown Copyright
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30091076

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 38 Abstract Views, 6 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 06 Feb 2017, 09:45:53 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.